Violent Crime

Phi Kappa Psi fraternity at the University of Virginia has voluntarily surrendered its Fraternal Organization Agreement with the University and suspended all chapter activities as an investigation into rape allegations unfolds.

About 700 people rallied at the University of Virginia Thursday, responding to a Rolling Stone Magazine report detailing charges of sexual assault at a prestigious UVA fraternity. Phi Kappa Psi has since closed its doors, called the incident intolerable and pledged full cooperation with a police investigation. 

Rally at UVA

Nov 20, 2014

About 700 people rallied at the University of Virginia responding to reports of sexual violence on campus. 

Students and faculty gathered on short notice for a protest organized by the Middle Eastern and Islamic Student Association.  A member of that group, Ahmad Intesar, proposed the gathering after seeing a story in Rolling Stone Magazine, recounting, among other things, the gang rape of a freshman at the prestigious Phi Kappa Psi fraternity.

While the disappearance of UVa student Hannah Graham is not the reason why Governor McAuliffe has created a Task Force on Combating Campus Sexual Violence, the ongoing search for her  puts a name and face on the issue of student safety. 

The task force chairman, Attorney General Mark Herring, says national statistics on the problem are appalling, and addressing it is long overdue.

Both the Governor and Herring spoke during the first meeting of the task force and emphasized that campus sexual violence must end.

The disappearance of Hannah Graham reminds parents of the need to warn their kids about dangers in the world, but it’s not an easy job  -- especially as children grow into young adults.  Experts in the field of psychology say it might be a good idea to teach kids the “P” word. 

When members of the so-called Islamic state began beheading American and British journalists and aid workers, recording and posting the executions online, one mother pleaded publicly with them to spare her son.  That plea failed, perhaps because the killers are psychopaths or sociopaths.

Seven years ago, after the tragic shootings at Virginia Tech, an outpouring of sympathy came to Blacksburg from around the world.

Much of it, in the form of objects:  candles, cards, letters, stuffed animals and works of art.  Archivists at the university have carefully cataloged and preserved these sacred objects, some of which will be on display for the first time this week.