Contingent Faculty: A Look at How Those at the Head of the Class are Compensated

The general public might think of universities as places for learning - and that would make teaching a valued resource, but a growing number of people at the head of college classrooms are making less than the minimum wage, have no job security and no benefits. In the first part of our series, we look at how a majority of college instructors are not tenured or even on track to full-time, tenured positions. Rose Forp spent many years training adults in the workplace. Over time, it dawned on...
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Virginia power companies will be doing more to help low income homeowners make their houses more energy efficient. And, the idea of using cash cards to pay jurors is picking up some critics. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project’s VaNews link on www.vpap.org.

Carilion Clinic

Lately, we’ve heard about a number of different summer camps in our region – specializing in everything from making movies to building computers, and it seems kids have the opportunity to learn whatever they want over the summer. Carilion Clinic operates one that could help some teenagers better determine their career paths. 

Five years ago, the federal government announced it would begin fining hospitals if Medicare patients were discharged but had to come back.  Experts argued there was little incentive to follow-up on patients, since medical centers would make more money if people were re-admitted. 

Some hospital administrators dreaded the change, but at the University of Virginia, they’re excited to report dramatic reductions in re-admissions.
 

As a result of not expanding Medicaid in Virginia, a new state Work Group is examining how to offset rising healthcare costs and the money it passed up from the federal government.  

This includes conducting an analysis of so-called “provider assessments”—which could tax hospitals, nursing homes, and other facilities for specific services.

The provider assessments would enable Virginia to receive matching federal Medicaid dollars. Analyst Deborah Bachrach from Manatt says all of the potential models must follow the same guidelines.

Coloring for Adults, a Work Place Unifier

Jul 29, 2015

In the past few years, hundreds of coloring books for adults have become available. Referred to as 'mental yoga,' the soothing value of picking up a crayon and creating a masterpiece has reached Roanoke – and it seems to have communal benefits. 

Earlier this month we aired a story from Sandy Hausman about AirBnB in Richmond - and how the home-sharing experience is, essentially, illegal there. Another Virginia city, however, has recently embraced the trend.

AirBnB has never exactly been ‘illegal’ in Roanoke, but when the idea of short-term rental was blooming, the City didn’t know what to make of it. River Laker was one of the first in Roanoke to register on AirBnB:

Galax Vies to Break World Record...Again

Jul 28, 2015

The 80th Galax Old Fiddlers’ Convention begins next Monday, August 3. On day two, Tuesday, of this year’s week long convention, hundreds of musicians will attempt to assemble the world’s largest mandolin ensemble.

Sound: “One, two, three, play.” (followed by hundreds of mandolins playing “Old Joe Clark.”)

That is the sound of 389 mandolins playing “Old Joe Clark” in the grandstands at Felts Park, home of The Galax Old Fiddlers’ convention.

Sound: cheering

New Study Finds Climate Change Means Risky Business

Jul 28, 2015

It took two years for scientists and economists to crunch the numbers based on 40 different climate models, but they’re out this week with a new report called Risky Business – an analysis of what a warmer planet will mean for Virginia. 

VA's Largest Polluter Scales Back Outdoor Burning

Jul 27, 2015

The Radford Army Ammunitions Plant is one of the few places that still burns waste from the making of explosives, outdoors, in the open air.

For years, activists have been urging the practice be stopped because of threats to human health and the environment.  Now plans are in the works to do that and more.

As more wineries are opening in Virginia grape production in the state is not keeping pace…and with many Commonwealth counties looking to replace obsolete courthouses issues of historic preservation may create complications. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project’s VaNews link on www.vpap.org.

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