State Government

Virginia has a new economic development proposal for regions within the state…it’s an effort to take some of the decision-making out of the hands of lawmakers and place it back into the hands of  stakeholders.  But as Tommie McNeil reports, the concept called “Go Virginia”  is also getting some mixed reviews.

Virginia’s schools don’t have enough qualified teachers for career and technical classes. So, lawmakers in Richmond are considering a bill that would ease requirements on those jobs. Under proposed legislation, schools could hire part-time professionals who know the subject to teach, but don’t have a teaching license.

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Lawmakers in Richmond are reviewing a bill that would help Virginians cut their energy costs, but critics say it could make power more expensive for customers.

Susan Hill works with people who have drafty homes and high utility bills.

She's in charge of the Richmond Region Energy Alliance, a nonprofit that helps families figure out how to reduce their monthly utility bill.

While the end result is savings, it does require some money down.  

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California has approved a new set of laws to protect the privacy of data, and with half of all e-mails in this country passing through data centers in Virginia, this could be the next state to take action. The legislature is considering bills that would require police to get a search warrant if they want a look at your electronic files.

The law is clear about what police need to search your house or car.

Usually, a warrant is required. But what about electronic data? At the

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While Virginia's legislature got back to work this week, the state's executive branch continues to try to tackle gun violence on its own.
In a first of its kind meeting, Attorneys General from Virginia, Maryland and D.C. met in Washington today to discuss how the regions can work together to reduce gun-related crime and deaths.

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring says reducing gun violence isn't just about preventing mass shootings.

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