Natural Resources

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For years the use of hydraulic fracturing—or fracking—has been exclusive to Southwest Virginia, but some organizations and communities are vehemently opposed to it. Now, as companies are exploring more energy sources throughout the state, such as natural gas and shale, officials are feeling more pressure to amend regulations that govern the practice. 

State Water Commission Chair and Delegate Thomas Wright says he's in favor of offshore drilling and whatever the state can do to produce more energy—but he also advocates environmental stewardship.

Chincoteague Pony Swim Celebrates 90 Years

Jul 22, 2015

This month marks the 90th year the Chincoteague Volunteer Fire Company's Saltwater Cowboys run their annual pony swim. The wild ponies, whose Spanish lineage dates back centuries, are moved from Assateague and Chincoteague Islands, to the fire company's carnival grounds where a selection of foals are auctioned off. But unless there's a fire, rounding up cowboys is sometimes more difficult than ponies.

At a booth to the entrance to Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge, park ranger Naomi Belton collects park fees and gives directions to the best places to see them.

Raise Your Own Pollinators

Jul 20, 2015

Virginia has lost 40-50% of its honey bee colonies since 2014, and a nursery in Richmond is taking action... urging its customers to help save these essential insects.

Jenny Jenkins Rash  is the Garden Center Manager at Sneed’s, a family owned nursery that’s done business in Richmond for 40 years.  Lately, she’s noticed something is missing from the lush grounds off Huguenot Road.

An environmental group is calling on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to extend the comment period for the proposed Mountain Valley Pipe Line.  The deadline was this past Tuesday, June 16TH.   It’s one of several requests for more time to discuss the potential impact of several pipelines proposed for the region.

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  The Environmental Protection Agency has ordered each state to cut back on emissions of carbon dioxide by 2030, and a new report shows Virginia will be nearly half-way there by 2020. 

The state has agreed to cut its rate of CO2 pollution by 38-percent, and at the Union of Concerned Scientists, Senior Energy Analyst Jeremy Richardson says the key is scaling back on coal.

“Virginia expects to retire 14 coal-fired generating units between 2012 and 2020, and that represents about 19% of the state’s coal fired generation.”