Mental Health

Suicide Prevention: Early Intervention is Key

May 8, 2014
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It’s a tough topic to talk about….suicide. Some say if anything good can come out of the tragedy experienced by Senator Creigh Deeds and his family, when he was stabbed by his mentally ill son, who then killed himself….it’s greater awareness about warning signs, risks, and treatment.

The most recent state assessments find teenagers between the ages of 16 and 19….and young adults, up to age 24…are especially vulnerable to higher rates of suicide.

Virginia will have new rules for managing people in a psychiatric crisis under final legislation approved on the last day of the General Assembly session. 

The bills extend the length of time that a person in a dangerous state of mind can be held in an emergency and ensure that a secure psychiatric bed will be found. this is only the first step for an initiative that will also evaluate how well the new system works.

VaNews for 03.03.14

Mar 3, 2014

Police officers in Chesterfield County have received some personal insights on interacting with mentally ill individuals...and a Hampton Roads woman found out it's not always easy to take a child out of martial arts training.

Those stories have been among the most frequently viewed over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on


Kaiser Health News

As the effort continues to press the Virginia House of Delegates to jump on board with Medicaid expansion, mental health advocates are warning of what could happen if those who are uninsured remain so. 

One coalition says that while both chambers have made addressing mental health a priority this session, those who suffer from illnesses will still face many challenges if they do not have the means to pay for critical services.

Mental Health Report Addresses Accountability

Feb 19, 2014

There’s new information on the state of the mental health system in Virginia.

A new report issued by the state’s inspector general reveals that Virginia is spending millions of dollars annually to house mental health patients who no longer qualify or need state care. 

According to the latest report by the Office of the State Inspector General, there are mental health patients occupying beds that could otherwise be used by people requiring emergency or long-term psychiatric care.