Law and Crime

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Gun owners from out of state will find it harder to carry a concealed weapon in Virginia, beginning this February.

Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring says the state will no longer recognize concealed carry permits issued by other states whose standards aren't as strict as Virginia's.

North Carolina, Kentucky, Tennessee -- Those states all border Virginia, and it used to be that if you had a concealed carry permit issued from them then Virginia would automatically recognize it as valid within its borders too.

martinsvillepolice.org

As Virginia Attorney General Mark Herring kicks off a study aimed at encouraging more minorities to enter law enforcement in the Commonwealth one of the Southside Virginia cities set to take part is dealing with severe financial problems that could make recruiting even more difficult. 

Martinsville has 51 police officers. Four of those officers are black. That number is even more striking when you consider that African-Americans make up 45% of the city's population.

martinsvillepolice.org

The Virginia Attorney General's Office is developing a plan to increase
diversity in police departments around the state beginning with a pilot
program in Danville and Martinsville.

Attorney General Mark Herring came here to the Bible Way Cathedral in Danville to launch the first phase of the minority recruitment program, which will be implemented in three steps.

Richmond Men Accused in White Supremacist Plot

Nov 12, 2015

In Virginia, two men accused of trying to buy weapons for use in a white supremacist plot were in court today for a preliminary hearing.

Authorities say the FBI foiled a plan, that began with robbing a jewelry store and ended with shooting or bombing black churches and Jewish synagogues.

Robert Doyle and Ronald Chaney III came on the FBI’s radar after an informant tipped them off that the two were part of a group that might be planning violence.

A governor appointed Parole Review Commission heard testimony that parole, dramatically curtailed by the state legislature in the 1990s,  must be reinstated. Others say it's time to reconsider the efficacy of no parole.

A commission appointed to consider reinstating parole met in Richmond Monday to hear from experts on crime and punishment and from victims like Judy Choendley who said the men who killed her father should never be freed.

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