K - 12

The sounds of colonial life in Williamsburg may be getting a lot louder soon.....and the term 'valedictorian' is taking on a whole new meaning for some high school students in Virginia and across the nation. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on vpap.org.

Virginia’s child care providers will be undergoing a number of changes that aim to enhance the safety of the children they are babysitting.  To draw attention to the new law, Governor McAuliffe held a bill-signing ceremony with advocates, lawmakers, and parents whose children had died while in unlicensed facilities. Participants said that while this law is a good start, the Commonwealth needs an even tougher one.

McAuliffe said the bill passed due to a grassroots movement led by the heartbroken parents of children who died in day care homes. 

Elementary and middle school students who fail Standards of Learning tests by narrow margins will have an opportunity to retake those tests this spring thanks to new regulations passed by the State Board of Education. The rules stem from a law that sailed through the General Assembly—but would not have taken effect until July 1st if the Board had not acted.  


If you have a teenager who’s getting on your nerves - one who can’t stop texting - here’s an opportunity for both of you to take a break.  The James River Association is offering high school students a chance to cruise for a week this summer - to learn about history, science, and life. 

Thirty students will paddle three different sections of the James River for eight days  --  beginning in the mountains on June 27th.  Lead educator Kyle Burnett says the first team of ten will negotiate a series of rapids en route to Lynchburg, including Balcony Falls.

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State officials are looking to local school divisions to develop some world-class, in-the-field ideas to reform education.  Following an application process, the state will award five school superintendents with $50,000 each for grants to craft innovative plans for their districts.  Superintendents are being asked to “dream big”—and contemplate how they would run their schools with complete flexibility for two years.