Health & Medicine

carilionclinic.org

The old way of keeping medical records on color-tabbed manila folders kept on rolling shelves is going away fast. It's being replaced with electronic records that patients can access as well. Tab O'Neal spoke with a doctor who says our medical records are as close as our computer.

The Importance of 'Care' in Healthcare

Mar 28, 2016

One of the requirements under the Affordable Care Act is that data must be gathered and analyzed to determine what’s working well and what’s not. According to a study by a Virginia Tech Professor, what matters more to patients than anything else is the quality of the connection patients have with their doctors. 

Lyme Disease in Winter: If You Can See Mud...

Mar 3, 2016

One of the nice things about winter? You can go for a walk in the woods and not be besieged by insects.  But not all bugs are dormant during the cold months.  As soon as the ground temperature gets above freezing, the tick that carries Lyme disease becomes active.  If you can see mud, there could be hungry deer ticks out looking for lunch. 

Anne Zajac is professor of parasitology at Virginia Tech.  Her specialty is studying earthworms, but a couple of strange discoveries soon had her doing a ground breaking scientific field study about a different species.

Marc Edwards

The drinking water expert from Virginia Tech, who first uncovered the lead contamination in Flint Michigan’s water supply, will lead ongoing testing of the water there. 

Flint Mayor Karen Weaver has commissioned Marc Edwards, a professor of environmental engineering at Virginia Tech, to pick up where he left off and continue monitoring the water after he first detected the problem last year.

A line in this year’s Virginia state budget calls for the shuttering of two psychiatric hospitals in southwestern Virginia.  But some are calling for them to remain open at a time when recent events have spotlighted the urgent need for more mental health services, not fewer.

Governor Terry McAuliffe’s budget proposal would provide $1 million to cover the costs of shutting down two psychiatric hospitals in southern Virginia.  The plan raised an outcry at a time when it’s becoming clear that there’s already a lack of sufficient beds for people in psychological crises in the state.

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