Health & Medicine

Heroin Abuse Skyrockets Among Women, Middle Class

Jul 19, 2015

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a new study that more women and individuals in the middle class are becoming addicted to and abusing heroin. Many experts cite the expensive price and difficulty of obtaining prescription painkillers as the reason. 

In it’s most recent study, the CDC found that heroin usage is up sixty percent in women and sixty-three percent in the middle class. Shane Fletcher is a Counselor at Mt. Regis Center for substance abuse.

As state lawmakers decide whether to mandate abuse-deterrent formulations for opioid medications in health insurance plans, an expert makes one thing clear: Americans have a huge problem with pain and don't manage it well. As a result, billions are being spent on pain-relief drugs that often lead to addiction. Some are urging lawmakers to do something to mitigate those costs.

Rising healthcare costs have prompted the state to try something new. 

Instead of relying solely on doctors and nurses to keep people healthy, the Department for Aging and Rehabilitation has been offering workshops for those with chronic diseases – teaching them how to manage diabetes, high blood pressure, chronic pain and other problems. April Holmes, Coordinator of Prevention Programs, says participants meet for two and a half hours each week, for six weeks, to explore better ways of caring for themselves.

The 'Kitty Hawk Moment' for Drones

Jul 16, 2015
Flirtey

This weekend is the 16th year the Remote Area Medical Team will be in Wise County Virginia providing free dental, medical, and vision care to people. And it’s the first time a drone will deliver medicine to the site.  It’s a real world test of how drones could deliver medical help to people in remote areas. 

Jon Greene is acting associate director of the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership at Virginia Tech. He says when it comes to UAS, Unmanned Aircraft Systems commonly known as drones, the main concern is safety for people on the ground.

Linking Depression to Genetics

Jul 16, 2015
https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University report a major breakthrough in our understanding of depression.  After five years of planning, more than three years of study and another year of analysis, they’ve found genetic  variants in people at increased risk for this common psychiatric disorder.

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