Emerging Technology

Privacy Paradox

Sep 15, 2014

When the topic of online privacy comes up, some people say, “get over it’ it’s a thing of the past.  Others say, not so fast; there are ways to protect what privacy you have left on line. 

Take the latest iPhone coming out with all its new features.  New operating systems mean new privacy settings to be selected, some easily do-able and others harder to find or figure out.

Neutrinos are the second most abundant particles in the universe.  They’re invisible and seem to have little impact on our daily lives, but without them life itself, would not be possible.  Now Scientists think they may be useful for monitoring nuclear reactors, like the one in Iran.  

Physicist Enrico Fermi named the particle he had long surmised existed, neutrino Italian for ‘the little neutral one’ because, it has a neutral electrical charge.

Boosting Biotech

Jul 10, 2014
Stock Photo

Virginia, no longer ranked as the best state to do business, still has a strong economic footing, especially in Northern Virginia. But because the state is so heavily reliant on defense contracts which have recently been on the federal chopping block, Governor McAuliffe is looking to strengthen the state's economy through other avenues.

Fariss Samarrai

Urban planners in Virginia are trying to make bicycling safer, but they’re hampered by a lack of statistics about who’s riding where.

Alec Gosse rides his bike to work at a Charlottesville company that analyzes data, and this year he was working on a PhD in environmental engineering. Those interests led him to try and solve a problem daunting city planners.

“There was no data for how many bikes were using various roads in the city.  It just didn’t exist.”

Without that information, they didn’t know where to make road improvements for cyclists.

The price of collecting and analyzing massive amounts of information has dropped dramatically over the last decade, creating a new path for discovery in many fields, but the evolution of big data raises big questions that scholars in Virginia hope to address.   From medicine to marketing, from politics to police work, people are buzzing about the potential to learn and grow by collecting and analyzing huge amounts of information.  This brave new world of big data also raises ethical questions and concerns about public policy and the law.

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