A look at education issues around Virginia.

Mallory Noe-Payne

Since the recession, state funding for higher education across the country has plummeted - including here in Virginia, where it remains a quarter below what it was before the recession. Governor McAuliffe revealed details today about how he’d like to fund higher education in the state for the next two years.

As the state has decreased funding for higher education, Virginia’s public colleges have had to increase tuition and fees.

It’s a budget year in Virginia -- meaning during this year’s legislative session the Governor and General Assembly will work to craft how the state spends its money for the next two years….

Governor Terry McAuliffe won’t reveal his proposed budget until next week, but Wednesday in Richmond he did announce a plan to issue $2.5 billion in bonds. Money from those bond sales will largely go to the state’s colleges. 

Overhauling 'No Child Left Behind'

Dec 7, 2015

Virginia educators and state leaders are soon expected to be able to exert more control over local schools across the commonwealth.

Lawmakers were supposed to overhaul No Child Left Behind in 2007 but they couldn't bridge the ideological divide. That's left a patchwork across the nation as the Obama Administration compelled states to embrace it's Common Core standards while granting waivers to some 43 states. Virginia Democratic Congressman Bobby Scott was a key player in scrapping No Child Left Behind. He says the new bill gives states the leeway they've been craving. 

VCU Commended for Closing Minority Graduation Gap

Dec 7, 2015
Creative Commons,

Virginia colleges have made strides in raising graduation rates for black and latino students, with VCU leading the way. That's according to a report from the Education Trust.

The study collected data on every public school in the country. It looked at each college's graduation rates today, and 10 years ago, comparing the rates for minority students to their white peers.

In Virginia you can have photographic evidence of cars illegally passing school buses but still not be able to prosecute the drivers...and a bill to introduced in the General Assembly would allow some convicted drug offenders to clear their records.

Those have been among the most read stories over the past week on the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link at