Education

A look at education issues around Virginia.

Cops In Classrooms

Jan 25, 2016

Last spring, the Center for Public Integrity named Virginia as the state most likely to call the cops on kids at school.  Now, the Legal Aid Justice Center is calling on Virginia’s legislature to do something about that.

  Children in Virginia are three times more likely than kids in other states to be arrested at school, and the Legal Aid Justice Center says the odds are even higher in certain communities and for certain children. 

“There’s massive racial disparities and there’s massive disparities with respect to students with disabilities.”

Virginia’s schools don’t have enough qualified teachers for career and technical classes. So, lawmakers in Richmond are considering a bill that would ease requirements on those jobs. Under proposed legislation, schools could hire part-time professionals who know the subject to teach, but don’t have a teaching license.

After a near miss in 2006, Virginia may soon have an official state reptile. And a bill now in the General Assembly would give local school districts a new way to raise revenue. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on vpap.org.

Creative Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Virginia’s Governor has proposed a series of changes to public education aimed at preparing students to join the workforce, but the state’s teachers may not like some of his ideas.  

Terry McAuliffe wants to set new requirements for high school grads, emphasize hands-on instruction, and offer industry credentials.  He thinks schools should be allowed to hire industry experts to teach on a temporary or part-time basis, but at the Virginia Education Association, which represents teachers, President Meg Gruber has doubts when it comes to science and math.

Mallory Noe-Payne

Virginia Commonwealth University is one of the state’s most diverse four-year colleges. But if you’re a student there you may not see that diversity in who’s teaching you. While 15% of VCU students are African-American, only 5% of full-time faculty are.
Students are demanding that VCU fix that problem-- and fast.

Christopher Brooks welcomes me to his office on VCU’s campus in the heart of downtown Richmond.

Pages