Education

SCHEV Outlines Policy
4:26 pm
Thu May 21, 2015

How to Close a College

Over the last several years, Sweet Briar College, Virginia Intermont, and Saint Paul's College have announced that they were closing—and now state officials are engaging in a broad discussion about what recourse families have when that happens.

State Council of Higher Education for Virginia Director Peter Blake says before a college closes, two important functions must be carried out. The first directly helps students.

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Education
11:03 am
Thu May 21, 2015

UVA Board Extends Pres. Sullivan's Contract

After five difficult years, observers were not sure if Teresa Sullivan would continue as president of the University of Virginia, but the first woman to hold that job received a near-unanimous vote of support this week.

From the outset, 65-year-old Teresa Sullivan had said she did not want to serve another five-year term.

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Health & Medicine
9:16 pm
Wed May 13, 2015

Lawmakers Hope Future Medical School Graduates Stay in Commonwealth

Flickr user COD Newsroom
Credit Creative Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Virginia has some of the best medical schools in the country, but state leaders are realizing that many medical students will live and get their education here--and, upon graduation, will look for better opportunities elsewhere. A state panel has been tasked with not only helping to produce more medical school graduates, but also keeping them in the Commonwealth.

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Education
5:32 pm
Thu May 7, 2015

Examining the Role of Civics in Education

Credit Creative Commons

The nation's eighth graders are scoring poorly in history, geography and civics. The National Assessment of Educational Progress tested eighth graders in 2010 and again last year with about 50% of the students scoring "basic" in the three subjects. Between one-quarter and one-third scored below and only 1 to 3% of the 29,000 students scored in the advanced range.

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"When Elephants Fight, the Grass Gets Trampled."
4:00 am
Wed April 29, 2015

Training Faculty for the World's Newest Country

A South Sudanese girl at independence festivities
Credit www.wikipedia.org

In South Sudan, there’s a saying:  When Elephants fight, the grass gets trampled.  More than fifty years of war has kept the young nation from finding its own footing.  But an effort by Virginia Tech aims to plant seeds of change there.

South Sudan won independence from the Republic of Sudan in 2011.  Much more than the grass was trampled and aid groups came in to help rebuild the region. But lasting change depends on the ability of local people to solve local problems and that means training teachers.  

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