Economy and Economics

The Bottom Line vs. the Waistline

Jan 8, 2016

It’s the time of year when people may be feeling they are maxed out on their credit cards. So is it time to go ‘cash only?’  Researchers at Virginia Tech’s Pamplin School of Business warn, there’s a subtle catch to using cash. It may lead you to splurge even more. 

Many people believe paying with cash instead of credit cards can help your bottom line.

“ You know cash is more painful to spend with right, so you actually feel the money leaving your pocket and you feel the pain, the psychological pain of spending.” 

It’s the time of year for helping others --  donating to toy drives or food pantries. But, as Mallory Noe-Payne reports, this holiday season might be a good time to re-think what we mean, when we say charity.

Walk around Virginia’s capital city, and you will see people begging on street corners, or sleeping on park benches. And this time of year, says Kelly King Horne, people hone in on it. Horne is in charge of Homeward, Richmond’s planning office for homeless services.

Not Your Grandparents' Factory

Dec 15, 2015
Mike Stanley/Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

 

There’s new evidence that the middle class has been steadily shrinking, according to a Pew Research Center Study. It happened during the same period that manufacturing jobs – once a hallmark of the middle class--- have been disappearing in this country.  

When you ask young people what they want to do with their lives, not many will tell you they want to go to work in a factory.

It’s a budget year in Virginia -- meaning during this year’s legislative session the Governor and General Assembly will work to craft how the state spends its money for the next two years….

Governor Terry McAuliffe won’t reveal his proposed budget until next week, but Wednesday in Richmond he did announce a plan to issue $2.5 billion in bonds. Money from those bond sales will largely go to the state’s colleges. 

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It looks like a strong Holiday buying season is in the forecast for Virginia. That’s according to the latest Virginia Consumer Sentiment report from the Roanoke College Institute for Policy and Opinion Research.

Virginians are generally feeling better about their financial situations. Alice Kassens is a Senior Analyst with the institute and professor of economics at Roanoke College; she says the report found that this consumer sentiment is at its strongest level since the recession.

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