Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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Asia
6:29 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Japanese Commuters Save A Life During Rush Hour

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. At a station in Japan, a bunch of rush-hour commuters kept the train running on time and saved a life. When a woman stepping off the train fell between the stopped car and platform, about 40 commuters went into action. Along with transit workers, the passengers pushed the 32-ton train far enough away that the woman could be pulled up, pretty much unhurt. And the train? It left only eight minutes late. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Pop Culture
5:56 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Seventh Try's The Charm For Hemingway Look-Alike

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm David Greene.

I mean, isn't it every white haired, husky, bearded man's ambition to look like Hemingway? Sure seemed that way at the annual Papa Hemingway Look-Alike Contest. The annual event was just held at Sloppy Joe's, a favorite Hemingway watering hole on Key West. The winner: software developer Stephen Terry. He beat out more than a hundred hopefuls, including the husband of chef Paula Deen. Those who didn't win, take heart, it was Terry's seventh try. Now that's one earnest effort.

NPR Story
5:10 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Political Reporters Hit The (Bike) Trail In Iowa

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Okay. Political stories often come from the White House and they often take our political correspondents, say, to Iowa. That's where three of them are right now. But not for an election cycle, but actually to cycle. NPR's Don Gonyea, Scott Horsley and Brian Naylor are all on vacation together, pedaling across the state of Iowa, hundreds of miles with thousands of other cyclists. It's an annual summertime ritual known as RAGBRAI.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Tue July 23, 2013

Republicans Pin Hopes On Senate Turnover In 2014

Originally published on Tue July 23, 2013 7:37 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

In Washington, D.C. the next election always seems just around the corner, even in the middle of summer when it seems a long way away to everyone else. Republicans are in the Senate minority today, but about now they're feeling confident about their prospects to pick up seats and maybe even regain the majority in 2014. NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson reports.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Tue July 23, 2013

What's Different About The Latest Push For Middle East Talks

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 8:28 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Secretary of State John Kerry is trying to bring Israeli and Palestinian officials to Washington to discuss a possible resumption of peace talks. Kerry announced on Friday that the two sides have tentatively agreed to preliminary talks but when and if actual peace negotiations will occur is uncertain. White House spokesman Jay Carney said yesterday he hopes the parties will be in Washington in the coming weeks.

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