Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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All Tech Considered
2:55 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Herzog Plumbs Guilt And Loss Wrought By Texting And Driving

Reggie Shaw killed two men while he was texting on a Utah highway. He now speaks to groups about the dangers of texting and driving.
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Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 4:31 pm

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Animals
2:53 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Wild Horses Run Free As Adoption Centers Fill Up

Katrina Boydon and her mustang Spirit. She adopted the horse as an orphaned foal with a rattlesnake bite on his hoof.
Will Stone KUNR

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 6:52 am

Drive about 20 miles north of Reno, Nev., into the barren scrubland and you're sure to see "wild" horses — more than 1,000, in fact. Just not in the wild.

Laura Leigh calls several mares to the edge of the dusty corral. She's a regular at Palomino Valley National Adoption Center. The horses eagerly rub their muzzles against her, their coats hot from the midday sun.

"We got to get you a home, don't we?" she says to one of the horses. "This one will let you scratch her withers and put your hands on her legs. You're adorable, aren't you?"

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The Salt
2:52 am
Fri August 16, 2013

Why This Year's Blueberry Bounty Has Growers Feeling Blue

Picker Erika Nicolas Garcia, 18, fills her pail at a blueberry farm near Hillsboro, Ore.
Anna King Northwest Public Radio

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 10:52 am

The blueberries on your morning cereal are less expensive this year. That's because farmers are harvesting a bumper crop this summer. It's good news for berry lovers, but the bounty might wreck some blueberry growers.

In Richland, Wash., Genoa Blankenship pops open the lid on a box of blueberries. Her three young children struggle to stop wiggling. Blankenship loves the idea of healthy snacks that are easy to take along to soccer practice.

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Middle East
11:40 am
Thu August 15, 2013

U.S. Cancels Military Exercise With Egypt Amid Crackdown

President Obama announced the cancellation of a joint military exercise with Egypt in the wake of that country's military government crackdown on protesters. At least 500 were killed in those skirmishes, including 40 police. For more, David Greene speaks with NPR's Scott Horsley.

Around the Nation
6:58 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Word Usage Heats Up Internet, 'Literally'

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene. The Internet is literally on fire this morning over the usage of a word. Traditionally literally means something that is strictly true. Google's dictionary, bloggers just noticed, says you can also use that word for emphasis. Like I would literally give my right arm to own a pickup truck. That's true. Grammar sticklers claim Google has sided with language traitors and broken the English language. In other words, the sky is literally falling. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

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