Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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Sweetness And Light
2:15 am
Wed September 4, 2013

Why Keep Athletes Eligible But Uneducated?

Ersin Kisacik iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 4:31 pm

Each football season brings exciting plays and game heroes, but Frank Deford says the real heroes are often overlooked.

As another school year and college football season gets underway, Deford looks at the frustrations and challenges facing educators to keep student athletes eligible.

Click on the audio link above to hear Deford's take on this issue.

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The Two-Way
9:44 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Says Right Strikes Can Hurt Assad's Capabilities

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., met with President Obama on Sunday at the White House.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 1:18 pm

By "taking out Bashar Assad's delivery capabilities of chemical weapons" the U.S. can make it much harder for the Syrian leader to wage war against his people and perhaps level the fighting field or turn it in favor of Assad's opponents, Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona said Tuesday on Morning Edition.

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NPR Story
8:48 am
Tue September 3, 2013

McCain Backs President On Syria Strikes

Republican Sen. John McCain of Arizona talks to Steve Inskeep about what he would like to see the U.S. do about Syria.

Around the Nation
6:49 am
Tue September 3, 2013

U.S. Navy Wins Battle Of Lake Erie, Again

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep with congratulations to the U.S. Navy, which won the battle of Lake Erie - again. Sailing ships re-enacted the victory over the British 200 ago during the War of 1812. The Port Clinton News Herald says the 2013 battle turned out the same, but with better technology: people captured the battle scenes on cell phones.

In 1813, the winning commander said we have met the enemy and they are ours. Which is short enough to say on Twitter. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Animals
6:43 am
Tue September 3, 2013

Woman Waits 8 Years To Get Diamond After Chicken Ate It

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 10:54 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. A diamond is forever, luckily, because a chicken only lasts about eight years - which is how long a woman in England is willing to wait to get back a diamond earring, after her pet chicken gulped it down while sitting on her shoulder.

The diamond earring could be removed surgically, but Claire Lennon told "The Telegraph" she worries the 6-month-old chicken wouldn't survive. And her daughter loves the bird so the diamond-wait, for the pet to die naturally.

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