Morning Edition on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Weekdays from 5:00 to 9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ, until 10:00 on RADIO IQ.

Every weekday for over three decades, NPR's Morning Edition has taken listeners around the country and the world with multi-faceted stories and commentaries that inform, challenge and occasionally amuse. Morning Edition is the most listened-to news radio program in the country and that's certainly also true at WVTF and RADIO IQ.

A bi-coastal, 24-hour news operation, Morning Edition is hosted by NPR's Steve Inskeep in Washington, D.C., and Renee Montagne at NPR West in Culver City, CA along with our own Tab O'Neal who provides state and regional news updates, weather and traffic information from our main broadcast center in Roanoke.

Produced and distributed by NPR in Washington, D.C., Morning Edition draws on reporting from correspondents based around the world, and producers and reporters in locations in the United States. This reporting is supplemented by NPR Member station reporters across the country as well as independent producers and reporters throughout the public radio system.

Morning Edition airs weekdays from 5:00-9:00 on WVTF/RADIO IQ with an added hour from 9:00-10:00 on our RADIO IQ and RADIO IQ With BBC News networks of signals.

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U.S.
3:05 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Little-Known Immigration Mandate Keeps Detention Beds Full

The federal immigration detention center in Florence, Ariz., is one of about 250 such facilities around the country. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) is required to house 34,000 immigration detainees per day, nationwide.
John Moore Getty Images

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 5:04 pm

Imagine your city council telling the police department how many people it had to keep in jail each night.

That's effectively what Congress has told U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement with a policy known as the "detention bed mandate." The mandate calls for filling 34,000 beds in some 250 facilities across the country, per day, with immigrant detainees.

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Around the Nation
3:04 am
Tue November 19, 2013

After Floods, Some Colo. Rivers Aren't Where They Used To Be

Excavators work to restore the original channel of Left Hand Creek. The creek's diversion structures sit clogged with mud, debris and stagnant water.
Jim Hill KUNC

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 7:34 am

In Colorado, farmers are scrambling to recover from September's historic floods — floods that decimated miles of roadways, cut off entire towns and sent rivers and creeks into areas they'd never been before.

Like Tim Foster's immaculate front yard.

"It was beautiful," he says. "I had four large blue spruces. We had hundred-year-old cottonwoods all along the bank. We had our irrigation and our pumps. It was just gorgeous."

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All Tech Considered
3:03 am
Tue November 19, 2013

The Surprising Cultural Stamina Of Pokemon

Participants compete in the 2013 Pokemon World Championships in Vancouver, Canada, on Aug. 10. The Pokemon franchise has become a billion-dollar franchise since it debuted on American shores 15 years ago.
Sergei Bachlakov Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 1:57 pm

Fifteen years ago, pocket-sized characters known as Pokemon arrived on American shores from Japan. The cute creatures were suddenly everywhere: television, video games, card games and a movie.

When the Pokemon cartoon theme song first hit American TV airwaves in 1998, "Gotta catch 'em all" became a mantra for kids. But few people imagined that in 2013 the stars of this cartoon would still be going strong.

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Tina Brown's Must-Reads
2:59 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Tina Brown's Must-Reads: On Survival

Daily Beast Editor-in-Chief Tina Brown
Victoria Will The Daily Beast

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:15 am

Daily Beast editor Tina Brown joins NPR's Steve Inskeep from time to time as part of an ongoing conversation Morning Edition calls Word of Mouth. This month she's talking about stories of survival — from a dangerous Navy SEAL mission in Afghanistan to a terrorist attack in Mumbai. And then there's survival of a different sort: sticking out a very long career in Hollywood.

Making It Through A War Zone

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Business
5:53 am
Mon November 18, 2013

More LED Lights Used In Holiday Displays

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 6:09 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. In the movie "Christmas Vacation" Chevy Chase's character attaches thousands of Christmas lights to his roof with a staple gun. When the lights go on, utilities have to boost their power to avoid a blackout. That would not happen today. Stores are selling more LED lights this year, which use less energy.

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