Marketplace

Weekdays at 6:30PM on WVTF/RADIO IQ

Marketplace with host Kai Ryssdal produced and distributed by American Public Media focuses on the latest business news both nationally and internationally, the global economy, and wider events linked to the financial markets.

The only national daily business news program originating from the West Coast, Marketplace is noted for its timely, relevant and accessible coverage of business, economics and personal finance. 

01/19/2018: Shutdown countdown

Jan 19, 2018

As we tape this, the United States government is hours away from grinding to a halt, barring a last-minute deal. The blame game is already starting, and that's where we'll start today's show. Then we'll look at lessons federal workers learned from the last shutdown. Plus, the latest on Amazon Prime, IBM and electric vehicle sales.

You can’t live in Lawrence Park, Pennsylvania, and not know General Electric. The company designed and built the entire community — the street grid, the houses — over a century ago.

Jim Connelly spent his childhood in the shadow of GE’s 350-acre facility near Erie. And eight years ago, after college and the military, he came home to Lawrence Park and joined the ranks.  

“I really admired that factory when I was growing up, wondering what they did inside the fence,” he said.

After years of decline, IBM reports a revenue jump

Jan 19, 2018

A 4 percent revenue hike is not big news for many companies. But for century-plus firm IBM it’s the first in half a decade, and could signal that its focus on cloud computing is paying off.

Click the audio player above to hear the full story. 

Amazon is raising its monthly Prime membership rate, from $10.99 to $12.99. But the annual membership cost is staying the same, at $99. So what’s the logic here? Is Amazon trying to push more people into becoming annual members? Might the price hike prompt some people to drop the service altogether? What are the pros and cons of this strategy?

Click the audio player above to hear the full story.

Garbage won't pile up during this government shutdown

Jan 19, 2018

During the last government shutdown, in 2013, garbage piled up in parts of Washington, D.C. The city’s budget was frozen because it was tied to the federal government. Washington was only able to function by dipping into its emergency reserves. It won’t be doing that again.

“We have an exemption for our local funds during the shutdown," said Jenny Reed, director of D.C.’s Office of Budget and Performance Management.

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