Tommie McNeil

Reporter, Richmond Bureau

Tommie McNeil is a State Capitol reporter who has been covering Virginia and Virginia politics for more than a decade. He originally hails from Maryland, and also doubles as the evening anchor for 1140 WRVA in Richmond.

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A number of new driving and traffic safety laws take effect in Virginia on Wednesday that could provide some relief to plenty of motorists.  But if drivers aren't careful, they also could be relieved of some hard-earned cash for new infractions.

If you're an impatient driver on a single-lane road with slower moving obstacles in front of you, there's good news.

“You may cross a double yellow line to pass a pedestrian or a device which is moved by human power. Which is including bicycles, skateboards, and foot scooters.”

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The FBI and Virginia’s law enforcement agencies have a new ally in their efforts to combat sex trafficking. As result, this partnership will lend potentially thousands of eyes and ears in places that police may not frequent, but truckers do, and pimps target.

"Truckers Against Trafficking" provides awareness and tools to those in the industry about signs of sex trafficking. The truckers and law enforcement have been exchanging ideas about the challenges associated with catching sex traffickers and best practices to combat it.

Prior to 2012, cardiovascular disease was the leading cause of death in Virginia, but now cancer is the Commonwealth's leading killer.

To help lawmakers craft state policies for the future, the Joint Commission on Health Care wanted to find out what the projected cancer rates will be over the next few decades.

UVa’s Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service compiled the data. Delegate and Doctor John O'Bannon describes the bottom line.

"I think their message is that there is a real probability as the population ages, that there will be an epidemic of cancer."

  Several years and one administration ago, we reported on some of the challenges pertaining to veterans’ homelessness.  Since then, new leaders have vowed to do all they can to eliminate it within the Commonwealth. 

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs and Retired Admiral John Harvey credits Governor McAuliffe for the initiative--and says his agency hit the ground running. One of the greatest challenges veterans describe is not receiving benefits because they don't have the proper ID.  Harvey says in some cases, they don't meet the criteria.

Reactions vary to a Democratic lawsuit challenging Virginia’s voter photo ID law—based primarily on which side of the political spectrum the stakeholders fall.  

Democrats argue that this is another attempt to disenfranchise minority and other voters, while the GOP and the law’s chief sponsor say it's designed to protect the integrity of the voting system. But political observers are wondering how this lawsuit will progress—and what's the best course of action for the state’s Democratic Attorney General.

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