Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

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Photographer Ben Greenberg
9:10 am
Fri May 9, 2014

Natural Virginia: Capturing the Beauty of the Old Dominion

Early Fall Morning Panorama from the Blue Ridge Parkway, Nelson County, VA
Credit Ben Greenberg

At a time when almost every American carries a cell phone camera, it takes courage to try and publish a book of photographs, but a Virginia man was determined to celebrate the beauty of this state in print.
 

Ben Greenberg began taking pictures as a new father – 44 years ago -- but was quickly drawn to landscapes in Virginia.

“All the way from the Eastern Shore to the mountains, from Southwest Virginia Highlands all the way to the Potomac.  There’s so much to be seen and to be photographed.”

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New Projects
4:43 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Dominion Slowly Heeding Push to Go Greener

Credit Phil Hollman/Wikimedia Commons

Shareholders hoping to push Dominion Power to go green are celebrating today, after four resolutions they proposed won about 20% support at the utility’s annual meeting.  Such resolutions are not binding, but they can be influential.

A shareholder resolution asking Dominion Energy to study the impact of greenhouse gases and the risk of investing in biomass won support from more than 20% of those voting at yesterday’s annual meeting. 

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Shockoe Bottom
9:40 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Richmond Wrangling Over Future of Historic Slave Trade Site

Ana Edwards, the chief opponent of the Shockoe Bottom stadium proposal, talks about historical markers at the Lumkin Jail historical site in Richmond.
Credit Steve Helber/AP via NPR

On a warm spring night, more than 150 people gathered in Shockoe Bottom, a name taken from the Native American word for a site in Richmond.

This part of town, bounded by I-95 and bisected by railroad lines, was central to a city that prospered from the slave trade.

"The best guesstimate is several hundred thousand people were sold out of Shockoe Bottom," says Phil Wilayto, a leader of the grassroots movement to establish a memorial park here. "Probably the majority of African-Americans today could trace some ancestry to this small piece of land."

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History
3:40 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Richmond, Va., Wrangling Over Future Of Historic Slave Trade Site

Ana Edwards, the chief opponent of the Shockoe Bottom stadium proposal, talks about historical markers at the Lumkin Jail historical site in Richmond, Va.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:34 am

On a warm spring night, more than 150 people gathered in Shockoe Bottom, a name taken from the Native American word for a site in Richmond, Va. This part of town, bounded by I-95 and bisected by railroad lines, was central to a city that prospered from the slave trade.

"The best guesstimate is several hundred thousand people were sold out of Shockoe Bottom," says Phil Wilayto, a leader of the grassroots movement to establish a memorial park here. "Probably the majority of African-Americans today could trace some ancestry to this small piece of land."

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Shareholders Meet This Week
3:36 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Solar Advocates Call On Dominion

Representative image of a California solar project.
Credit Dominion

The parent company of Virginia’s largest electric utility  announced, last month, that it had bought six solar development projects in California – arrays that will supply enough energy to power nearly 35,000 homes. 

The news upset advocates for green energy here.  They want Dominion to develop solar here, and they’ll be speaking up at the company’s annual shareholders meeting this week in Cleveland. 

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