Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Pages

History
3:40 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Richmond, Va., Wrangling Over Future Of Historic Slave Trade Site

Ana Edwards, the chief opponent of the Shockoe Bottom stadium proposal, talks about historical markers at the Lumkin Jail historical site in Richmond, Va.
Steve Helber AP

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 10:34 am

On a warm spring night, more than 150 people gathered in Shockoe Bottom, a name taken from the Native American word for a site in Richmond, Va. This part of town, bounded by I-95 and bisected by railroad lines, was central to a city that prospered from the slave trade.

"The best guesstimate is several hundred thousand people were sold out of Shockoe Bottom," says Phil Wilayto, a leader of the grassroots movement to establish a memorial park here. "Probably the majority of African-Americans today could trace some ancestry to this small piece of land."

Read more
Shareholders Meet This Week
3:36 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Solar Advocates Call On Dominion

Representative image of a California solar project.
Credit Dominion

The parent company of Virginia’s largest electric utility  announced, last month, that it had bought six solar development projects in California – arrays that will supply enough energy to power nearly 35,000 homes. 

The news upset advocates for green energy here.  They want Dominion to develop solar here, and they’ll be speaking up at the company’s annual shareholders meeting this week in Cleveland. 

Read more
Virginia Museum of Fine Art
10:04 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Monuments Men: The Richmond Collection

South Seas Landscape, Emil Nolde, 1914
Credit Gift of Dr. George and Mrs. Marylou Fischer, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The film Monuments Men raised public awareness about what happened to important works of art in Nazi Germany. 

Some of it was destroyed, while other pieces were hidden away.  One especially valuable collection made its way to Richmond, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts says it just got one of the missing paintings back.

Between 1910 and 1930, one family in Germany - the Fischers --  collected the works of modern painters.  Robin Nicholson, Deputy Director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts says the Nazis disliked and often destroyed such work.

Read more
Developing
6:15 am
Fri May 2, 2014

Toxic Chemicals Spills and Waterways: What's the Solution?

Credit wset.com

There have been a dozen toxic spills from railroad cars in North America over the last year and three cases of river pollution in this region over the past four months.  Are these accidents happening more often?   Should this country have rail lines and toxic storage facilities so close to its waterways, and what’s being done to prevent future problems? 

Read more
Earth Model
11:39 am
Wed April 30, 2014

Map of the Climate

Scientists studying climate change have focused on greenhouse gases – how we can  produce less or maybe remove some of what’s already in the atmosphere, but a team at the University of Virginia will take a different approach.

Eleven people from eight different fields – including business, law, anthropology and engineering – will look at how we use land as part of a massive mapping and modeling project for planet Earth. Deborah Lawrence is professor of environmental sciences at UVA.

Read more

Pages