Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Soothing the Soul

Mar 6, 2013

One of every 88 children in this country has some degree of autism – up 78% over the last ten years.  It’s a puzzling psychological condition that makes it difficult to communicate, but it is possible to help these kids relate to the world around them.  One Staunton couple has made some surprising discoveries in that vein.

Barry Kolman conducts the Shenandoah Symphony Orchestra – an exciting job that brings him great satisfaction.  He also teaches music at Washington and Lee University, but of all the musicians he’s encountered, one gives him the greatest joy.

A report in the Washington Post suggests that University of Virginia Rector Helen Dragas is again at odds with the university’s president, and the faculty is taking sides.

When UVA President Teresa Sullivan was reinstated last summer, she and Rector Helen Dragas assured the public they could work together, but it appears the two are feuding over long-term goals for the university and its medical center and the role that a governing board should play in day-to-day operations.

Prosecutors and public defenders in Virginia are paid by the state, but on average, lawyers who work for the Commonwealth’s Attorney make 25% more than lawyers who defend the poor.  Now that  one public defender is asking for a raise, and others may follow suit.

Oysters were once plentiful on Virginia’s Eastern Shore, but their numbers have fallen dramatically over the last century, due to overfishing, pollution and disease. 

Scientists and watermen are working to bring them back, and the partnership has led to a unique course at the University of Virginia – one taught, in part, by a man who has no PhD but could easily write a dissertation on his beloved bivalves.

Four generations of Biddlecombs have lived on the Eastern Shore, harvesting oysters.  76-year-old Dudley Biddlecomb began work when he was just five years old.  

Virginia could become the first state in the nation to restrict a new class of generic medications.  But drug companies want limits and some pharmacists are concerned.

Amgen is the world’s largest biotech company – a California firm that makes medicines from living cells.  These remedies, known as biologicals, are expensive and protected by patents, but the Affordable Care Act clears the way for cheaper, generic forms of these products.  

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