Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

It’s been more than 20 years since construction workers at Virginia Commonwealth University unearthed the remains of about fifty people in an old well near the Medical College of Virginia.  Historians believe they were the bones of former slaves, whose bodies were stolen from local cemeteries for dissection by medical students. 

Photo: Janet Moore

For decades now, opera houses have tried to attract new fans to an art form that’s historically drawn a wealthy older crowd.  

 The English National Opera sends whole orchestras into schools – hoping to wow kids.  In Knoxville, the opera hosts cocktail parties where performers mingle with guests and break into song.    The Ash Lawn Opera in Charlottesville has tried several tactics to win the hearts and minds of people under 60.       

Pluto Flyby

Jul 10, 2015
NASA/New Horizons

It’s taken nine years for the NASA spaceship New Horizons to travel nearly 3 billion miles – to a far corner of our solar system, but later this month, it will fulfill its mission.  

On July 14th, just before 8 a.m. New Horizons will begin a fly-by of Pluto, the dwarf planet named for the Roman god of the underworld.  The space craft has traveled faster than any other launched from Earth, but after nine years, it won’t be able to stop for a visit.

For most kids, summer camp means hiking, swimming, cooking over an open fire, and sleeping under the stars – or at least under the roof of a cabin. For a few, however, camp could be a ticket to Hollywood.

On a hot afternoon, when their friends might be swimming or hiding in their airconditioned homes, a dozen young people have gathered in the living room of a location to begin work on their first film of the summer. For about 300 kids between the ages of 8 and 18, camp means making movies.

Many aspiring college students take time each summer to visit different schools or to take part in orientation at the campus where they’ll study in the fall, but a much older group of visitors has been touring universities in Virginia.

Virginia Commonwealth University is less than a mile from the state capitol, but 22 members of the House Appropriations committee recently took a bus ride across campus to complete a statewide listening tour focused on higher education. Here’s committee vice chair Steve Landes.

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