Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Suffolk Police Department

A Virginia lawmaker known for his extreme opposition to abortion has been charged with cruelty and injury to children.  Richard Lee Morris of Suffolk was arrested earlier this week.

justgrimes / Creative Commons

Opponents of Virginia’s photo ID law made their case today before the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals.  They claim the requirement creates an unnecessary burden for people who want to vote.

Executive Office of the President of the United States

This season the American Shakespeare Center features King Lear and the Rise of Queen Margaret – stories of political people in olden times, but the Blackfriar’s Theater also offers a surprise – the tale of a rude, bawdy politician who promised a big change in Washington and became America’s president.

Associated Press

Dominion Virginia Power says it wants to develop offshore wind power, but the high cost of installation would make it far more expensive than electricity produced by burning fossil fuels or operating a nuclear plant. The utility also wonders how well offshore turbines would fair during a hurricane. Now, engineers at the University of Virginia have come up with a design that could solve both of those problems.

Domestic violence is a big problem in this country, with as many as one in three women reporting abuse in the course of their lives.  In some cases, the risk increases during pregnancy, but a new study from the University of Virginia shows it’s possible to protect women by screening for danger during pre-natal visits.