Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

Wikimedia Commons

With rain still falling and heavy fog surrounding the Shenandoah National Park, firefighters took a break, announcing that the blaze is largely contained and many of the trees have survived. 

Wikimedia Foundation

The term “bird brain” is used to imply stupidity, but a new book by Jennifer Ackerman suggests our feathered friends are anything but.  It's called the Genius of Birds.

Since childhood, when she had a pet parakeet named Grisgris, Jennifer Ackerman has marveled at the intelligence of birds.

Virginia’s General Assembly has agreed on a budget for the next two years, but Governor Terry McAuliffe is not happy with some parts of the spending plan.  In an exclusive interview, he told WVTF’s Sandy Hausman he wants more cash for certain schools.

Virginia’s House and Senate have agreed on a budget that increases state dollars for education, but critics say rich schools will do better than poor ones under the current funding formula, and we’ll still be far behind where we were when the recession hit.  

Since 2009, Virginia has cut about $800 million a year in funding for public schools. Now, lawmakers have agreed to restore some of that money - about $856 million over two years.

AP Photo/Charlie Riedel

Virginia is home to the world’s largest pork producer – a Chinese owned company called Smithfield, and this region produces nearly nine million hogs a year.  It’s also a hotbed of opposition to the factory farms where most of those animals live.  

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