Sandy Hausman

WVTF/RADIO IQ Charlottesville Bureau Chief

Sandy Hausman joined our news team in 2008 after honing her radio skills in Chicago.  Since then, she's won several national awards for her reporting from the Society of Professional Journalists, the Society of Environmental Journalists, the Radio, Television and Digital News Association and the Public Radio News Directors' Association. 

Sandy has reported extensively on issues of concern to Virginians, traveling as far afield as Panama, Ecuador, Indonesia and Hong Kong for stories on how expansion of  the Panama Canal will effect the Port of Virginia, what Virginians are doing to protect the Galapagos Islands, why a Virginia-based company is destroying the rainforest and how Virginia wines are selling in Asia.

She is a graduate of Cornell University and holds a Masters degree in journalism from the University of Michigan. 

University of Mary Washington

As Virginia considers allowing drilling for oil off its coast, scientists at the University of Mary Washington are doing basic research that could prove valuable in the event of a spill.  Sandy Hausman reports on what they hope to learn after two weeks of trolling for oil in the Gulf of Mexico.

For most people, an ocean cruise is vacation. 

For Charlie Sharpless, two weeks on the Gulf of Mexico was work.  

Despite major efforts by Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe and outside groups, such as former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Everytown for Gun Safety, no party-shifting happened in yesterday’s election. Republicans still maintain control of the House and narrow control of the Senate. This means the ongoing Medicaid expansion fight will likely die in the upcoming General Assembly session.

This month, the world marks the 70th anniversary of the United Nations - an institution founded with the enthusiastic support of a Virginia man now known as the architect of the UN. 

As a student at the University of Virginia, Edward Stettinius fell short on the academic front - too busy, it seems, to complete the coursework needed for a degree. 

Faculty Fighting Back

Oct 26, 2015
AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

With a growing number of college campus shootings, it’s no surprise that some professors are feeling uneasy.  Others are coming up with some ways to limit firearm access without violating the Second Amendment.

As a senior writer at the Chronicle of Higher Education, Beth McMurtrie spends a lot of time talking to professors, and lately she finds they’re feeling angry and anxious.

  Two boys from Fredericksburg will be arraigned this morning – charged with planning a mass shooting at their high school.  Sandy Hausman has that story.

Over the weekend, officials announced they had arrested two students, aged 15 and 17, after another kid told police of a plot described on social media.  Spotsylvania County  Commonwealth’s Attorney Bill Neely told reporters:

“These youths had access to firearms, and apparently their plot was to phone in a bomb threat and then shoot people as they came out of school.”