Robbie Harris

WVTF/RADIO IQ New River Valley Bureau Chief

Robbie Harris is based in Blacksburg,  covering the New River Valley and southwestern Virginia. 

The former news director of  WBEZ/ Chicago Public Radio and WHYY in Philadelphia, she led award-winning news teams and creative projects.  Early in her career, she was the Humanities Reporter at New Hampshire Public Radio, and also served as a tape editor on Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Robbie worked at New Jersey Public Television and WCAU/CBS TV in Philadelphia while she pursued  her Master's Degree at the University of Pennsylvania.  During college, she was a Page at Saturday Night Live in New York and a reporter and program host for Cross Country Cable Television in Somerville, NJ.  Robbie also worked at the Rutgers College Radio Station, WRSU and was part of the team which founded "Knight Time Television" at the university.

Ever since two natural gas pipelines were proposed to traverse Virginia, some people have been trying to stop them. But at every turn, government approvals have been granted and both projects got underway earlier this spring.

pixabay.com

The Facebook fiasco is calling attention to an application known as 'machine learning.' That's where computer systems benefit from their experience, and automatically 'improve' their performance going forward. Could the same  be in store for the tech industry? 

The American Chestnut tree has mythic stature in tree lore. Today the old giants of people's memories are long gone from the landscape, wiped out by an Asian blight a hundred years ago. And even though they still loom large in the history and culture of Appalachia, new research suggests, their mythic proportions are likely, just that.   

Courtesy Appalachians Against Pipelines

Activists opposing the Mountain Valley natural gas Pipeline in southwest Virginia are camped in the Jefferson National forest, hoping to delay construction. One woman has been living on a monopod blocking the pipeline's path. U.S. Forest Law enforcement have closed an access road, preventing supporters from getting food and water to her. 

Courtesy Appalachians Against Pipeline

Activists who oppose the Mountain Valley Pipeline are living in the Jefferson National Forest, hoping to delay the project. Two tree sitters have been on Peters Mountain in West Virginia for more than a month.  And one woman has been living on a monopod, in a section of forest where pipeline construction is slated to take place. 

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