Robbie Harris

WVTF/RADIO IQ New River Valley Bureau Chief

Robbie Harris is based in Blacksburg,  covering the New River Valley and southwestern Virginia. 

The former news director of  WBEZ/ Chicago Public Radio and WHYY in Philadelphia, she led award-winning news teams and creative projects.  Early in her career, she was the Humanities Reporter at New Hampshire Public Radio, and also served as a tape editor on Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Robbie worked at New Jersey Public Television and WCAU/CBS TV in Philadelphia while she pursued  her Master's Degree at the University of Pennsylvania.  During college, she was a Page at Saturday Night Live in New York and a reporter and program host for Cross Country Cable Television in Somerville, NJ.  Robbie also worked at the Rutgers College Radio Station, WRSU and was part of the team which founded "Knight Time Television" at the university.

Matt Wasson, Appalachian Voices/Creative Commons

Burning coal to make electricity isn’t its only impact on the environment. The mining process has also been shown to pollute nearby waterways.

New rules proposed by the Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement to protect that water, will be debated over the next several months. Some see them as a potential threat to dwindling coal jobs and others, as not strong enough to protect the environment.

REDIT HARALD HOYER / CREATIVE COMMONS

The ultimate routes of natural gas pipelines that would run through Virginia have yet to be determined.  Among the concerns that raises, is; what effect could pipeline construction have on people’s well water? 

www.epa.gov

The permit that allows the Radford Army Ammunitions Plant to burn hazardous waste from firearms outdoors is up for renewal. Community activists see an opportunity to address environmental and health concerns about the open burning – and state regulators see a chance to explore new technology to solve an old problem.

Just a handful of people turned at the Blacksburg Public Library on a recent afternoon for a meeting of the Environmental Patriots of the New River Valley.

Rural Opioid Abuse

Jul 9, 2015

Prescription drug abuse in the U.S. has been on the rise for decades.  Most studies show the increase has been greater in rural areas.  But a new study suggests that’s not the case.

It has long been considered a fact that there were more risk factors for opioid abuse in rural areas.  Here’s how that thinking goes…

“Not a lot of jobs so lots of time on my hands. I don’t have a lot of money, so what am I going to do to entertain myself.”

This Saturday a new icon will join the tradition in a forth of July parade. Along with the birthday cakes for America and various incarnations of things red, white and blue, will be a little known character, who symbolizes protection of rivers and streams in Virginia and beyond.

Shannon Ritter has a huge fish in her garage.

Pages