Robbie Harris

WVTF/RADIO IQ New River Valley Bureau Chief

Robbie Harris is based in Blacksburg,  covering the New River Valley and southwestern Virginia. 

The former news director of  WBEZ/ Chicago Public Radio and WHYY in Philadelphia, she led award-winning news teams and creative projects.  Early in her career, she was the Humanities Reporter at New Hampshire Public Radio, and also served as a tape editor on Fresh Air with Terry Gross.

Robbie worked at New Jersey Public Television and WCAU/CBS TV in Philadelphia while she pursued  her Master's Degree at the University of Pennsylvania.  During college, she was a Page at Saturday Night Live in New York and a reporter and program host for Cross Country Cable Television in Somerville, NJ.  Robbie also worked at the Rutgers College Radio Station, WRSU and was part of the team which founded "Knight Time Television" at the university.

Creative Commons/Ron Dollete

You can tell a lot about a culture from its cuisine: what it values, what challenges it faces. In Appalachia, where people have lived off the land for centuries, it was common practice to ‘eat local’ way before that was cool. Now that the rest of the world is trying to do the same, people are looking anew at this region’s cooking. Instead of seeing it as a food of poverty, some are suggesting it’s an undiscovered gem in American regional cooking.

 

      

“What we’re seeing now is, that employers are looking for candidates that are rooted in an academic discipline, are more prepared to enter the work force, but who can also problem solve with what we call a sustainability lens.”

Angie DeSoto is director of the new Sustainability Institute at Virginia Tech.  It offers a month-long boot camp for juniors and seniors how to focus whatever job they’ll be doing at a firm through that sustainability lens.

Virginia’s primary election, coming up on Tuesday, is many things, but one thing it is not, is a snooze.  Many young voters say they’re excited about the race. They hear candidates staking out clear positions on issues that affect them. Robbie Harris talked with some who will be voting in their first presidential primary.

OK, this is a group of very tuned in college students. And our conversation is far from a scientifically balanced survey.

Creative Commons

A new study confirms that the number one cause of traffic accidents is distracted drivers.  But it’s not only texting behind the wheel that’s to blame.

We’ve all heard the warnings about as texting or talking on the phone while driving.  But a new study cites another important factor in car crashes, the driver’s emotional state.  

The Virginia Tech Transportation Institute found emotionally agitated drivers had ten times the risk of a collision says Mindy Buchanan-King, Director of Research communications at VTTI.

Creative Commons, Flickr user Will Fisher

Virginia’s coal economy has endured boom and bust cycles for generations.   But this time may be different. Competition from cheaper fuels and climate concerns are creating a downward spiral for the industry. What some see as a ‘war on coal’ others see as a timely transition to new energy sources, but everyone is wondering what that future will look like.

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