Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is an award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR's newscast unit, APM's Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. 

For more frequent updates from Richmond, or occasional commentary on rock climbing and vegetable gardening, you can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

 

Law students around the state are demanding a change in Virginia’s Bar Exam. They say a question that asks for mental health history has a chilling effect on future lawyers. The push comes after the American Bar Association recently recommended states re-evaluate whether to ask for the sensitive information.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

Hundreds of young people marched on the capitol in Richmond Friday to protest gun violence. It was part of a nationwide event on the anniversary of the Columbine shooting, meant to keep up energy and pressure on lawmakers to enact gun control.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

 

 

There are countless women’s groups in Virginia, one even dating back to the 1890’s. Now a new space in Richmond is aiming to revive the tradition with a twist. The Broad is part work space, part event venue, part social club. But it’s all, just for women.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

 

 

As tree clearing for the Mountain Valley Pipeline moves forward in southwest Virginia, some Democratic lawmakers in Richmond are asking for things to slow down. They’re also demanding support for a protester, who has been sitting in the pipeline’s path.

MBANDMAN / CREATIVE COMMONS

 

 

Virginia’s House of Delegates met for a veto session Wednesday, lawmakers tried to override only one of Governor Ralph Northam’s vetoes.

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