Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is an award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR's newscast unit, APM's Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. 

For more frequent updates from Richmond, or occasional commentary on rock climbing and vegetable gardening, you can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

Steve Helber / AP

 

 

The controversial Atlantic Coast Pipeline faces its final regulatory hurdle in Virginia: permits to be voted on by the state water control board. The two day board meeting began Monday morning with a pump-up for anti pipeline activists. 

(AP Photo/Steve Helber)

 After two full days of public hearings, Virginia’s State Water Control Board has given its stamp of approval on the Mountain Valley Pipeline. The pipeline is slated to carry natural gas, running 300 miles through southwest Virginia.

Steve Helber / AP

 

 

The fate of a controversial pipeline is now in the hands of Virginia’s Water Control Board. The board heard final public comment on the Mountain Valley Pipeline Wednesday. If approved, it would carry natural gas through much of southwest Virginia.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIO IQ

 

 

Research shows black women are held to higher standards in the workplace, and when they make a mistake they’re more harshly punished. But one Virginia based nonprofit is trying to change the way the world views black girls, and they recently enlisted a local artist to help with the cause.

Steve Helber / AP

 

 

For those who have been following the progress of two natural gas pipelines, all eyes are on Richmond this week, where members of a citizen board could determine the future of the Mountain Valley Pipeline.

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