Mallory Noe-Payne

Reporter - Richmond

Mallory Noe-Payne is an award-winning reporter and producer based in Richmond, Virginia. She's done work for NPR's newscast unit, APM's Marketplace and Public Radio International. 

Although she's a native Virginian, she's also worked for public radio in Boston. There, she helped produce stories about higher education, including a nationally-airing series on the German university system.   In addition to working for WGBH, she's worked at WAMU in Washington D.C. She graduated from Virginia Tech with degrees in Journalism and Political Science. 

For more frequent updates from Richmond, or occasional commentary on rock climbing and vegetable gardening, you can follow Mallory on Twitter @MalloryNoePayne

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIOIQ

 

 

Richmond-area Congressman Donald McEachin met with Virginians who benefit from the DACA program, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. If Congress doesn’t act soon, the program could end.

 

Milenia Rojas is a senior in highschool. Next year she’s studying engineering at University of Rochester, on a full ride.

But for Rojas, who was born in Bolivia and is a DACA recipient, there’s a fear looming over that college decision.

Lindsay Fox / Flickr

  Members of a Richmond City Council work group did not give their stamp of approval to a cigarette tax Thursday - pushing off the decision to a later date. The conversation comes after the city recently passed an increase to the meals tax.

 

When Richmond City Council voted to increase the meals tax to help pay for new schools, it was controversial. Many asked: Why don’t we tax cigarettes? So Councilman Parker Agelasto submitted an additional proposal to do just that.

 

Steve Helber / AP

 

 

The chances for Medicaid expansion in Virginia crept up Thursday when a key Republican lawmaker from Southwest Virginia announced his support for the plan.

 

Terry Kilgore is a prominent conservative in Virginia politics.  Speaking on the John Fredericks Show, he says he now supports expanding the health insurance program for the poor, known as  Medicaid, if Virginia includes work requirements.

Steve Helber / AP

Heading into this year’s General Assembly Republicans had been battered at the polls. They were clinging to a single-vote majority that they won by by the luck of the draw. Now, one month in, Republican Speaker of the House Kirk Cox is upbeat.

Mallory Noe-Payne / RADIOIQ

There’s a push to get students excited about computer science and tech. A new public high school in Richmond is tapping into that trend. But the school, called CodeRVA, isn’t just relying on innovative curriculum. It’s also an entirely different model of teaching, where school is a workplace.

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