News

Tazewell County in Virginia's southwest coalfields would rather not be the site of a major wind power project. And a surprise change of address has complicated the life of a woman in Chesapeake.  Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project’s VaNews link on www.vpap.org. Fred Echols reports. 

Susan Sermoneta/Creative Commons https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode

A Virginia lawmaker believes a simple ride in a nontraditional taxi could put your personal information in jeopardy. Now that delegate is pushing for legislation to further limit the information that companies such as Uber and Lyft can collect and store about passengers.  

Don't Buy This Book!

Aug 21, 2015

When eleven professional writers from Smith Mountain Lake decided they wanted to do something out of the ordinary they considered their options and finally settled on trying to produce the worst novel ever written.

With the work now complete they believe they may have attained their goal.

Sound of Music Singalong

Aug 20, 2015

 This weekend, Charlottesville joins a growing number of American cities where fans of the movie The Sound of Music can indulge their passion by singing along.   

The Paramount Theater was on the lookout for ways to use its new HD projector when it learned that a singalong version of the 1965 film Sound of Music could be theirs for a day.  Marketing Director Katherine Davis recalls the moment.

“We saw this title that was available with the words on the screen -- the little bouncing dot, and we said, ‘We have to have this at the theater.’”

Charlottesville's Garage: Alternative Art Space

Aug 20, 2015
http://www.thegarage-cville.com/

Central Virginia boasts plenty of great places for concerts, but there’s one venue that offers a unique experience for the audience, and the bands that play there.

 

The garage sits between a funeral home and the office of Christ Episcopal Church. The audience sits across the street on a low wall at the edge of Lee Park.  
 

“The busier and busier it gets, we spread up the hill, and you can dance at the back, you can dance in the road if it’s a quiet night," says Madeleine Partridge, who has worked two dozen shows since May.

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