Bill Portlock, Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Fones Cliffs along the Rappahannock River in Richmond County is a favorite place for bald eagles to gather, to sleep, and to watch for their next meal in the river and marshes below. But a plan for a commercial development is pitting conservationists against entrepreneurs.

Miami-based Diatomite Corporation of America wants to rezone their 975-acre property and begin building a championship golf course, restaurant and bar and more than 700 houses. Depending on whose side you're on, the development will either join or displace the bald eagles atop the cliffs.

Creative Commons

Virginia lawmakers say one topic that will again be discussed during the upcoming General Assembly session is improving healthcare in the Commonwealth. But that goal remains difficult when a large portion of the bright students who attend the state’s six medical schools are forced to move elsewhere due to a lack of residency slots. One critical point of discussion will be how to open up more slots AND pay for them.

AP Photo/Evan Vucci

With a changing of the guard afoot at the U-S Capitol, Speaker John Boehner’s sudden resignation is revealing deep disagreements within the Republican Party...and it's on display in the Virginia congressional delegation.

Virginia seems to have just missed out on having one of the most powerful people in the nation hail from the state. Eric Cantor was the House Majority Leader and was largely seen as Speaker Boehner’s successor until he got ousted in a primary by Dave Brat. Republican Congressman Scott Rigell says the state is feeling Cantor’s loss now. 

Seeing homelessness with greater clarity is the goal of an exhibit of photographs taken by homeless women and children.  They were given disposable cameras and asked to take pictures through their days. Tab O'Neal went to the exhibit in Lynchburg and spoke with David Neumeyer, Vice President of the James River Council for the Arts and Humanities and Sarah Quarantotto, executive director of Miriam's House, about the women and photographs that tell so many stories.

In one month, Virginians will head to the polls to elect all 140 members of the House of Delegates and state Senate.  But according to a recent Christopher Newport University survey, only 34% of voters say they have followed news about the General Assembly candidates—even though partisan control of the closely divided Senate is at stake.  Although some of the seats are fiercely contested, a lack of competition throughout the state may be part of the problem.