News

The quest for clean, sustainable energy has scientists testing new ways to produce it.  One approach is to look for savings in energy that’s currently being wasted.  Researchers at Virginia Tech have come up with a new way to literally transform some of that waste  into electricity.                               

 

Instagram: @MOCKCON2016

Washington and Lee University hosts one of the country’s most prestigious mock political conventions every presidential election year, and 2016’s begins today.

Washington and Lee University has been predicting the out-of-office party Presidential nominee with notable accuracy since 1908. In fact, they’ve only been wrong twice since 1948 - that year they chose Arthur Vandenberg over eventual nominee Thomas Dewey, and in 2008 they predicted Hillary Clinton would win the nomination over Barack Obama.

Virtual Dementia Tour Comes to Virginia

Feb 10, 2016
Second Wind Dreams

More than seven million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease or some other form of dementia caused by damage to nerve cells in the brain.  Symptoms include loss of memory, judgment, language and motor skills.  Because people don’t recover from dementia, we don’t really know how it feels, but an assisted living company here in Virginia is offering virtual dementia tours, designed to give staff and family members a sense for what it might be like.  Sandy Hausman took the tour and filed this report.

The President’s Clean Power Plan put on hold by the Supreme Court is something many in Virginia have supported.  It directed states to craft their own plans to combat global warming under EPA guidelines. Some say, ‘plan or no plan,’ the move to cut greenhouse gas emissions already underway will continue regardless.

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

According to a new poll from the Virginia Education Association, almost three quarters of Virginians say teachers in the state don’t make enough money. It looks like teachers will be getting a raise in this year’s budget...but the question is how much.

Virginia’s teachers make almost $7,000 below the the national average. And that’s making it hard for the state to attract, and keep, teachers in the classroom -- says Meg Gruber with the Education Association.

Pages