Law & Crime

Legal and Criminal

Anne Marie Morgan

Some local branches of the NAACP and other community organizations are speaking out about police treatment of African-Americans—especially the recent high-profile incidents in the U.S. where some have died while in custody or under pursuit.  They’re taking their concerns on the road with a listening tour that will enable citizens to share their own personal experiences -- and they’re hoping the “Spring Social Justice Series” will help spark wholesale changes in the criminal justice system.

As advocates mark National Crime Victims Week, in Virginia they're marking the 20th anniversary of the state’s very own Crime Victims' Bill of Rights.  But experts say those provisions, said to have given sufferers more rights with teeth, are also more relevant now as the state deals with proposals to address campus sexual assaults. 

Tax-Related Identify Theft

Apr 22, 2015

Tax-related identity theft typically occurs when a scammer files a forged tax return using someone else’s Social Security number to claim a refund. In 2013, there were nearly 3 million cases of tax-related ID theft, and the numbers are on the rise.

Police Force & Body Cameras

Apr 21, 2015

As the public conversation continues about the appropriate use of police force, a number of state lawmakers are proposing the use of body-worn cameras by public safety personnel to document what happens during traffic stops and other interactions.

That has prompted a Secure Commonwealth Panel subcommittee to thoroughly examine all of the issues surrounding use of the cameras in the Commonwealth.  They turn out to be far more complex than just strapping on a camera and recording police business.

Smithsonian Institute #888

Virginia’s Pamunkey  Tribe was dealt a setback in its effort to gain federal recognition by the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

Everyone knows Pocahontas, but do you know what tribe she hails from? Virginia’s Pamunkey Indians claim her as an ancestor. While Pocahontas and the Pamunkey have roots that predate the nation’s founding, the tribe isn’t recognized by the federal government because their records were destroyed early last century because a Virginia policy declared only two races: white and black.