Arts & Culture

Arts and culture

Seeing homelessness with greater clarity is the goal of an exhibit of photographs taken by homeless women and children.  They were given disposable cameras and asked to take pictures through their days. Tab O'Neal went to the exhibit in Lynchburg and spoke with David Neumeyer, Vice President of the James River Council for the Arts and Humanities and Sarah Quarantotto, executive director of Miriam's House, about the women and photographs that tell so many stories.

Bring Mary Home

Sep 28, 2015

When the western Virginia Frontier was being settled in the 1750s, a young pioneer woman was captured during an Indian raid. Mary Draper Ingles was taken from her home near what is today, the Blacksburg campus of Virginia Tech.

People have been fascinated by the story of her escape and her harrowing 400-mile trek back home. In those days, many people were captured during Indian raids and not very many ever escaped or returned to their homes. A museum in Radford is looking to create a monument to Mary and her story.

A New Understanding of What Cats Want

Sep 22, 2015
Virginia Tech

There’s something about cats that has attracted humans for centuries. They were worshipped in ancient Persia and today they star in endless Internet videos.  But that love and admiration does not appear to extend to health care. 

Over the last decade, cat visits to the vet have dropped nearly 50 per cent. 

Three tiny  day old kittens are keeping warm in a small incubator. Veterinary Technician Robyn Fox says their mother could not be found and someone brought them in.

For poor kids in American cities, life can be hard.  Gangs, guns and drugs are part of the landscape, but one historian says things were even worse in Richmond after the Civil War. More than a thousand lived on the streets including at least 100 kids - selling newspapers for a penny apiece and doing battle with rocks.

While millions of TV viewers watch and thousands converge on the capital city of Richmond for the 2015 UCI Road World Championships, right in the heart of the area is a museum that could blunt some of the negative publicity the city received over its Confederate monuments.