Wildlife

Virginia Tech

After a long silence, one of the largest broods of Cicadas in Virginia is coming back. Brood 2 has been

slowly growing under ground for the past seventeen years and for people who are anywhere near them, it might get loud. Robbie Harris has more.

Poisoned Eagles

Apr 25, 2013

Federal and state wildlife agencies are searching for those responsible for poisoning six bald eagles last month on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. 
 

Ironically, the eagles were found on a farm in Birdsnest, Virginia, a well-known migratory corridor. Eagles often arrive in late winter when food is scarce so they scavenge.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service along with Virginia's Department of Game and Inland Fisheries say someone may have set out poisoned bait to kill a fox or coyote but killed five eagles instead.

August Rode/Flickr via Chesapeake Bay Program

Virginia and other Chesapeake Bay States are under orders from the EPA to reduce the amount of phosphorous and nitrogen going into our rivers and streams, but a new report adds urgency to the cause. 

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and other environmental groups have a new ally – a fish. 

The Cicadas Emerge

Apr 10, 2013

April may be known for more than showers this year. Some insects will make a return this spring after nearly two decades underground. . .

These creatures look a little frightening with their red eyes, black bodies and gold wings but there’s nothing to fear with the cicadas about to emerge from the earth.  Virginia Department of Forestry spokesman Chris Asaro says that’s where they’ve been waiting for the past 17 years.

The public comment period is now open on the Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries’ proposed new regulations for Fox Hound training preserves.  

Fox Hunting has a long history in Virginia, but in the 1980s increased land development limited where hunters could train their dogs in the skill of the chase. 

That's when what are known as Fox Hound Training Preserves were created; privately owned enclosures where the dogs could practice.  Today there are 37 preserves in 22 counties, ranging from 100 acres to around 800, mostly in southeastern Virginia.

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