Wildlife

Building Bridges

May 23, 2013

If you listen to our programs on a regular basis, you know Gerry Krueger – the Albemarle County resident who has spent much of her life watching and writing about the geese on a pond near her home, including one disabled bird named Charlie. 

She also taught school and tutored children with special needs, like Sean, who lived with his deaf mother and struggled to speak, read and write. 

Today, she’s retired from teaching but has not stopped writing about the birds and about Sean.



 

Happier Honey Bees

May 7, 2013
Dan Addison via UVA

With the coming of spring, bee hives across the state are buzzing, but beekeepers say the insects face another challenging season - gathering pollen from plants sprayed with pesticides, fighting off parasites and disease. 

Rowan Sprague is an engineering student whose career took a surprising turn at the University of Virginia.  That’s where she started hearing all kinds of interesting stuff about bees.

Virginia Tech

After a long silence, one of the largest broods of Cicadas in Virginia is coming back. Brood 2 has been

slowly growing under ground for the past seventeen years and for people who are anywhere near them, it might get loud. Robbie Harris has more.

Poisoned Eagles

Apr 25, 2013

Federal and state wildlife agencies are searching for those responsible for poisoning six bald eagles last month on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. 
 

Ironically, the eagles were found on a farm in Birdsnest, Virginia, a well-known migratory corridor. Eagles often arrive in late winter when food is scarce so they scavenge.

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service along with Virginia's Department of Game and Inland Fisheries say someone may have set out poisoned bait to kill a fox or coyote but killed five eagles instead.

August Rode/Flickr via Chesapeake Bay Program

Virginia and other Chesapeake Bay States are under orders from the EPA to reduce the amount of phosphorous and nitrogen going into our rivers and streams, but a new report adds urgency to the cause. 

The Chesapeake Bay Foundation and other environmental groups have a new ally – a fish. 

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