State Government

Gov. McAuliffe Unveils Budget Plan for Virginia

Dec 18, 2015

Governor Terry McAuliffe has presented his full two-year budget proposal to a select group of finance leaders from Virginia’s legislature at the state capitol. Following a surplus last year, the governor’s budget is the most expensive in Virginia history - topping $100 billion.

After higher than normal tax revenues last year, plus the lowest unemployment rate in Virginia since the recession, Governor McAuliffe says now is the time to keep building the economy.

Mallory Noe-Payne

Since the recession, state funding for higher education across the country has plummeted - including here in Virginia, where it remains a quarter below what it was before the recession. Governor McAuliffe revealed details today about how he’d like to fund higher education in the state for the next two years.

As the state has decreased funding for higher education, Virginia’s public colleges have had to increase tuition and fees.

It’s a budget year in Virginia -- meaning during this year’s legislative session the Governor and General Assembly will work to craft how the state spends its money for the next two years….

Governor Terry McAuliffe won’t reveal his proposed budget until next week, but Wednesday in Richmond he did announce a plan to issue $2.5 billion in bonds. Money from those bond sales will largely go to the state’s colleges. 

Politicians in Richmond are already gearing up for 2017 elections -- Delegate Rob Bell announced Thursday afternoon that he’s running for Virginia Attorney General.  

Delegate Bell, a republican from Albermarle County, ran for his party’s nomination in 2013 but lost to Republican Senator Mark Obenshain -- Obenshain then went on to lose the general election to Democrat Mark Herring. Herring will be in the office until 2017.

Nicholas Boullosa, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Interest in the whole ‘farm to table’ movement is growing.  But one aspect of it continues to be controversial in Virginia; direct farm sales of raw, unpasteurized milk.  Some say it should be a personal choice. And others warn, it’s a question of public safety. 

At the farmer’s market in Blacksburg, customers come early for their raw milk so they can get it before it’s gone. Steve Moll, a builder in town is here almost every week.

“Yeah, It’s just so good. It really has flavor and it has cream.  Real cream. I make butter out of it.”

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