State Government

KOMU News, Creative Commons

In a landmark 5 to 4 decision today in the case of Obergefell v. Hodges, the United States Supreme Court affirmed marriage equality for all 50 states. 

 

The ruling protects the marriages of nearly 2,000 Virginia couples who have married since marriage equality came to Virginia in October, thousands more who have had their marriages recognized, and dozens of children who have been adopted or had both their parents placed on their birth certificate.

 

Anne Marie Morgan

After facing a $439-million shortfall at the end of the last state fiscal year, the Commonwealth is poised to reap the benefits of an improving economy with a multi-million-dollar budget surplus. State employees, college faculty, teachers, and State Police troopers also stand to gain.

Finance Secretary Ric Brown said annual revenues have grown by 7.3%—ahead of the 4.7% forecast. 

“If that were to continue—that variance—through June 30th, it’s worth about $427 million dollars.”

VA to Stop Issuing Confederate License Plates

Jun 23, 2015

 Governor Terry McAuliffe wants the Confederate flag banished from all Virginia license plates.

He references the killings at a historic black church in Charleston, South Carolina…as well as a Supreme Court decision that states can limit the content of license plates.

Virginia vanity plates include one for the Sons of Confederate Veterans, which features the battle flag in the logo.

  Several years and one administration ago, we reported on some of the challenges pertaining to veterans’ homelessness.  Since then, new leaders have vowed to do all they can to eliminate it within the Commonwealth. 

Secretary of Veterans and Defense Affairs and Retired Admiral John Harvey credits Governor McAuliffe for the initiative--and says his agency hit the ground running. One of the greatest challenges veterans describe is not receiving benefits because they don't have the proper ID.  Harvey says in some cases, they don't meet the criteria.

Governor McAuliffe with Integrity Commission Members

While the General Assembly passed legislation earlier this year to toughen Virginia’s ethics laws, a gubernatorial panel insists that those reforms are only the beginning.  At its June meeting, the Governor's Commission on Integrity and Public Confidence in State Government held a wide-ranging discussion about what to target next for reform. 

The commission also expressed interest in delving into Virginia’s one-term limit on governors, merit-based judicial selection, and independent redistricting.

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