State Government

It’s a budget year in Virginia -- meaning during this year’s legislative session the Governor and General Assembly will work to craft how the state spends its money for the next two years….

Governor Terry McAuliffe won’t reveal his proposed budget until next week, but Wednesday in Richmond he did announce a plan to issue $2.5 billion in bonds. Money from those bond sales will largely go to the state’s colleges. 

Politicians in Richmond are already gearing up for 2017 elections -- Delegate Rob Bell announced Thursday afternoon that he’s running for Virginia Attorney General.  

Delegate Bell, a republican from Albermarle County, ran for his party’s nomination in 2013 but lost to Republican Senator Mark Obenshain -- Obenshain then went on to lose the general election to Democrat Mark Herring. Herring will be in the office until 2017.

Nicholas Boullosa, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

Interest in the whole ‘farm to table’ movement is growing.  But one aspect of it continues to be controversial in Virginia; direct farm sales of raw, unpasteurized milk.  Some say it should be a personal choice. And others warn, it’s a question of public safety. 

At the farmer’s market in Blacksburg, customers come early for their raw milk so they can get it before it’s gone. Steve Moll, a builder in town is here almost every week.

“Yeah, It’s just so good. It really has flavor and it has cream.  Real cream. I make butter out of it.”

AP Photo/Steve Helber

A quick round-up of election results for Virginia’s state senate: Republicans maintained control. No incumbents lost. Any seat that was held by a Republican is still held by a Republican. And the same goes for Democrats. Nothing flipped. And, that’s despite big money being spent.

It’s a fairly straightforward calculation: $45 million dollars in campaigning plus low voter turnout equals zero change. Quentin Kidd is a political scientist at Christopher Newport University.

Despite major efforts by Democratic Governor Terry McAuliffe and outside groups, such as former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s Everytown for Gun Safety, no party-shifting happened in yesterday’s election. Republicans still maintain control of the House and narrow control of the Senate. This means the ongoing Medicaid expansion fight will likely die in the upcoming General Assembly session.

Pages