State Government

Gun Debate
8:40 am
Thu April 9, 2015

State ACLU Sympathizes with Advocates on Vetoed Gun Permits Bill

Gun-rights advocates who vowed to keep addressing an issue which they say violates civil liberties may have some ammunition when state lawmakers return to Richmond for next week's Veto Session.  The state ACLU’s executive director is sympathizing with advocates who say LEGAL concealed-carry permit-holders are being unfairly targeted by law enforcement in neighboring states that do not recognize those permits.

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Problems with Voting Machines
8:03 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Study Examines Problems with Virginia's Voting Machines

VA Elections Commissioner Edgardo Cortes
Credit Anne Marie Morgan

An interim study by the Virginia Department of Elections indicates that numerous localities have voting machines that are wearing out—and some have potential security problems.  The investigation was prompted by reports of irregularities during last November’s election. The result could be a new and costly requirement to replace some widely used touch-screen voting machines.

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Government & Politics
5:06 pm
Thu April 2, 2015

ABLE Savings Trust: Lighten the Load

Legislation signed by Governor McAuliffe creates what he says is the first state that establishes a trust account for certain people with disabilities.

 

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Surveillance Legislation
6:06 am
Thu April 2, 2015

Virginia ACLU Urges Lawmakers to Reign In Surveillance Powers

Credit Creative Commons, https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

While the Virginia ACLU applauds Governor McAuliffe's signing of a number of bills this past legislative session, the organization opposes his amendments to several bills that had aimed to reign in the government’s powers of surveillance--and which passed the General Assembly overwhelmingly.  The ACLU is asking state lawmakers to reject the amendments when they soon return to Richmond.  

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Mental Health Reform
7:20 am
Wed April 1, 2015

Mental Health Reform Outcomes, Months Later

Assistant Commissioner for Behavioral Health Daniel Herr listens to the mental health task force

The practice of “streeting”—or releasing people with mental illnesses when psychiatric beds are not found for them—came to light in 2013 when that happened to Senator Creigh Deeds’ son, who later took his own life.  But changes in civil commitment laws to reform the state’s crisis response system were subsequently approved and took effect last July.  State officials have unveiled new statistics that reveal the effects of those reforms.

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