Drones & Jobs

Mar 5, 2014
Virginia Tech/College of Engineering

There’s been a lot of attention on Drones recently.  But alongside concerns about privacy and military applications, is potential job creation in Virginia as a new industry rises. 

Virginia is one of seven sites selected for Drone testing research projects.  That got Virginia Tech’s office of economic development thinking about what that might mean for the state if this new industry takes off.  Estimates are as many as 100,000 jobs could be created, nationwide over the next ten years.

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech is one of six sites that will test drones as part of push to integrate them into the nation’s airspace in the next few years.  


The Federal Aviation Administration selected 6 public entities to test unmanned aerial vehicles, known as drones. Virginia Tech will look at safety, from technical risks, to other potential failures in the remotely piloted planes.

Martha Rosler. Cellular.

Charlottesville is the first city in the nation to pass a law restricting the use of drones in its airspace, and now a New York City artist has created a special show on that subject.


May 14, 2013

In Hollywood there’s the ‘Oscars.’   In Nashville, the Country Music Awards.  In the New River and RoanokeValleys, it’s the “Tech” Awards. 

Every year, the Roanoke- Blacksburg Technology council honors its stars. 

This Thursday (5/16/13) evening, 600 people will gather at the Hotel Roanoke for an awards ceremony and party announcing the  winners of the Roanoke/ Blacksburg Technology Council’s Tech Nite Awards.

For a list of TechNite nominees, visit

Cyber Teachers

Mar 28, 2013
Virginia State University

Most educators agree that kids learn best when teachers tailor their approach, working one-on-one with students, but it’s too expensive for every child to have his or her own teacher. 

Now, however, a Virginia psychologist is hoping to create a computer that can teach individualized lessons, adjusting speed and content based on a student’s face.  

Could we create talking, thinking robots to work in our classrooms – providing individualized instruction?  Could a computer be taught to tell when a student is losing focus or getting confused?