A New Understanding of What Cats Want

Sep 22, 2015
Virginia Tech

There’s something about cats that has attracted humans for centuries. They were worshipped in ancient Persia and today they star in endless Internet videos.  But that love and admiration does not appear to extend to health care. 

Over the last decade, cat visits to the vet have dropped nearly 50 per cent. 

Three tiny  day old kittens are keeping warm in a small incubator. Veterinary Technician Robyn Fox says their mother could not be found and someone brought them in.

The 'Kitty Hawk Moment' for Drones

Jul 16, 2015

This weekend is the 16th year the Remote Area Medical Team will be in Wise County Virginia providing free dental, medical, and vision care to people. And it’s the first time a drone will deliver medicine to the site.  It’s a real world test of how drones could deliver medical help to people in remote areas. 

Jon Greene is acting associate director of the Mid-Atlantic Aviation Partnership at Virginia Tech. He says when it comes to UAS, Unmanned Aircraft Systems commonly known as drones, the main concern is safety for people on the ground.

Linking Depression to Genetics

Jul 16, 2015

Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University report a major breakthrough in our understanding of depression.  After five years of planning, more than three years of study and another year of analysis, they’ve found genetic  variants in people at increased risk for this common psychiatric disorder.

Pluto Flyby

Jul 10, 2015
NASA/New Horizons

It’s taken nine years for the NASA spaceship New Horizons to travel nearly 3 billion miles – to a far corner of our solar system, but later this month, it will fulfill its mission.  

On July 14th, just before 8 a.m. New Horizons will begin a fly-by of Pluto, the dwarf planet named for the Roman god of the underworld.  The space craft has traveled faster than any other launched from Earth, but after nine years, it won’t be able to stop for a visit.

Bioprinter at UVA Designed to Print Tissue and Organs

Jun 19, 2015
Sanjay Sunchak/University of Virginia

Organ donation saves millions of people each year, but the fact is that there aren’t enough organs to go around.  Now, scientists, engineers and students at the University of Virginia have begun using a machine that could someday make replacement parts for humans. 

The bioprinter is a small, table-top robot with a couple of tubes that contain human cells.  Guided by a computer that has analyzed images of a body part, the device lays down layer after layer of sticky material or gel and cells that are genetically programmed to work in certain ways.