Nutrition and Obesity

Nicholas Boullosa,

Interest in the whole ‘farm to table’ movement is growing.  But one aspect of it continues to be controversial in Virginia; direct farm sales of raw, unpasteurized milk.  Some say it should be a personal choice. And others warn, it’s a question of public safety. 

At the farmer’s market in Blacksburg, customers come early for their raw milk so they can get it before it’s gone. Steve Moll, a builder in town is here almost every week.

“Yeah, It’s just so good. It really has flavor and it has cream.  Real cream. I make butter out of it.”

Farm Bounty on the School Lunch Tray

Oct 14, 2015

Virginia recently celebrated farm-to-school week, highlighting the connection between farmers around the state and what’s on the tray in the lunch line.

But for one private school in Richmond, farm-to-table is more than just one week out of the year.

St. Andrews Elementary School in Richmond had some unusual visitors for lunch earlier this month -- chickens.

The two Rhode Island Reds were part of a lesson on healthy eating. Kindergarteners through fifth graders got to learn what the chickens eat, and how their diet affects the eggs they produce.

It’s a sad fact that we produce enough food in this country to feed everyone in it, yet hunger remains a problem for many. 

Virginia Tech is joining the effort to change that.  It kicks off its “Campus Kitchens” program Wednesday, September 30th.  It’s a carefully orchestrated volunteer effort to save still-fresh food, left over from student dining halls, and get it to people who need it.  

As Hippocrates said, let food be your medicine. That’s the idea behind a new movement that’s stressing the ‘farm’ in ‘pharmacy:’

A pretty white picket fence surrounds a garden of about a half-acre in what used to be a parking lot in Christiansburg.

Kelli Scott is an agricultural and natural resources agent with Montgomery County Cooperative Extension.

"We actually have some watermelon and Okra blooming you know those are like traditionally really hot weather plants."

Health Kick: Mom on a Mission

Jul 27, 2015

Over the past 30 years, rates of childhood obesity in this country have quadrupled.  Eighteen percent of kids and 21% of teenagers are now considered overweight.  It’s a problem that has one Charlottesville mother on the warpath - preaching and writing the gospel of healthier habits.

Shelley Sackier is the slender mother of two healthy kids, so you might not expect her to worry much about the growing number of American children with a weight problem, but she has known - from an early age - that eating too much of the wrong things could have uncomfortable consequences.