Natural Resources

Cleaning the Chesapeake Bay

Oct 7, 2014

With a businessman in the governor’s mansion and a legislature talking about cutting costs, one environmental group is moving to assure that there’s enough money set aside to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. 

It argues that for every dollar the state invests in keeping pollutants out of rivers and streams, it will gain $4 in benefits.

We’ve seen economic reports on how fishing, shipping, recreational boating and tourism on the Bay benefit the state of Virginia, but now the Chesapeake Bay Foundation is looking at a bigger picture. 

Climate Change & the Chesapeake Bay

Sep 15, 2014
Jenny Dreyer

Next week the U.N. will bring experts from around the world for a climate change summit in New York. On the Chesapeake Bay scientists are looking at what a warmer bay might mean for species like the blue crab and striped bass.

AP

Fracking has produced massive amounts of natural gas in West Virginia.  North Carolina and Virginia want some. 

Now, Duke Energy and Piedmont Natural Gas have announced they would team up with AGL and Richmond-based Dominion to make that possible -- building a pipeline through Virginia.  The news provoked an outcry from the environmental community and grassroots groups.
 

StreamWatch

Aug 26, 2014
StreamWatch

Analyzing water is a complicated business.  It can contain any number of pollutants and require a variety of regulations to clean it up, but the state of Virginia is using a simpler approach – letting nature determine water quality, and asking citizens to help.

On a sunny weekday afternoon, four people arrive at a one-lane bridge northeast of Charlottesville, unpacking a car loaded with mysterious gear – nets, gloves and waders, a table and chairs.  They could easily be mistaken for picnickers.  In fact, they’re on a more serious mission.

Fracking has produced a glut of oil and gas in West Virginia and Pennsylvania.  Energy companies are desperate to get those products to market, and utilities are anxious to make the switch from coal to clean-burning gas. 

There is, however, something standing in the way – people who want nothing to do with pipelines in their communities.  In Nelson County, three groups have already formed to fight a pipeline that would also pass through Buckingham, Dinwiddie and Brunswick counties en route to North Carolina.

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