Natural Resources

Coloring books are usually for kids, and they’re rarely considered art, but a Charlottesville man has published a coloring book for all ages, with black and white drawings that took at least forty hours to create. 

Bob Anderson is an architect who likes to build green.  He’s always considered himself a conservationist, and when his son decided to host a bachelor party in the Costa Rican rainforest, Anderson was delighted. 

The Corcovado National Park was remote, lush and teeming with beautiful birds and animals.

Annually for about 13 years, Virginia—like many other states—has been losing about 30% of its honey bee population to a host of problems.  

Some might think that there’s no need to worry.  But aside from the delicious honey they produce, bees are a major contributor to the production of Virginia agriculture, the state's top commodity.

Kill the bees, kill the economy—not to mention furthering the slow breakdown of the ecosystem. So what's leading to the decline? Virginia Tech entomologist Dr. Troy Anderson says a lot of factors are responsible.

If you think you’ve been seeing more solar panels on houses around Virginia, you’re right. Residential rooftop solar here grew at the same rate as the national average in 2014.

Solar electric power accounted for almost a third of the nation’s new energy generating capacity last year.  More than wind and coal for the second year in a row, according to the Solar Energy Industry Association. SEIA says residential continues to be the fastest growing market segment for solar in the U.S.

Forum on Pipeline Projects

Mar 9, 2015

More than 130 people gathered in Virginia Western Community College’s Whitman Auditorium Monday to learn more about natural gas pipelines.

Sponsored by The Cabell Brand Center, the forum sought to present arguments from both supporters and opponents of those pipelines… with explanation about the roles local, state and federal governments play in evaluating proposals for three pipelines planned to cross Virginia. 

The debate continues over the Mountain Valley Pipeline slated to run through parts of southwestern Virginia, carrying natural gas.  Some say it will be a benefit to the region and others disagree. 

This Sunday, the anti-pipeline group, Preserve Giles is holding an informational session at Newport Recreation Center. It’s part instructional and part fundraiser for the organization.