Natural Resources

photo: Colleen Redman, www.looseleafnotes.com

The Mountain Valley Natural Gas Pipeline that’s being proposed to run through South Western Virginia made a U-Turn when it came to Floyd County. Last fall, the gas companies changed the original route, bypassing the rural county. Company officials have said the protest movement that sprang up in Floyd had nothing to do with their decision, but others believe it made a difference. 

One of them is Mara Robbins, who founded the Preserve Floyd Movement last summer to fight the pipeline. Now, she’s been hired by an Environmental group to continue that work throughout the region.

Public Perplexed by Pipeline Bill

Jan 26, 2015
www.dom.com

Regulating utilities in Virginia is a complicated job, and making sense of the rules requires expertise that few voters have, so it’s no surprise that citizens hoping to stop Dominion’s Atlantic Pipeline were alarmed by a bill that would change the way gas companies recoup their investment in pipelines.

The Brock Environmental Center

Dec 2, 2014
Chesapeake Bay Foundation

Many people spend their weekends looking at houses. Some are in the market to buy.  Others are just nosey, but recently Virginians toured a new building like no other in the nation – a place that gets all its water from rain, generates all the power it needs, has not a single flush toilet and keeps the floors clean in an ingenious way. 

It’s harvest time for tomatoes in the New River Valley. That’s not as strange as it sounds because these tomatoes are growing inside a huge greenhouse in the New River Valley.

The new venture promises to bring jobs --and more locally grown tomatoes to the region. 

 

You may have already seen tomatoes from Red Sun Farms in supermarkets. The parent company in Mexico has hundreds of acres of greenhouses there and in Canada, but this is the first time they’ll grow the fruit here. And by here, we mean Dublin Virginia.

  

In recent years, as the National Park Service has faced deep funding cuts and a stagnant number of visitors, the country's demographic changes have made its problems more pronounced.

Most visitors to National Parks are white, and increasingly, they're also older.  For instance,  Virginia’s  Shenandoah National Park is one of the nation’s most visited and accessible parks, yet recent research out of the University of Idaho indicates that 92% of visitors in 2011 were white.  

Pages