Natural Resources

Virginia Public Access Project

Western Virginia landowners have gone to court to keep kayakers and others from using creeks that cross their property...and conflicting federal rulings have put Virginia's ocean fishing season at risk. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on vpap.org.

   

Determining the Fate of the Cownose Ray

Feb 19, 2016

Oyster restoration efforts around the Chesapeake Bay come with a variety of concerns including one that returns every spring with the annual migration of the cownose ray. A new Florida State University report published by Nature is using new data to refute claims that cownose rays are responsible for the collapse of the oyster industry. 

Mountain Valley Pipeline Discussion Group

Plans for three new natural gas pipelines in Virginia have been the source of contention between environmentalists and energy companies.

That debate landed in Richmond, as environmental groups pushed for the repeal of a law that makes it easier for energy companies to survey private land. 
 

George Jones grew up in Giles County on a farm his father bought in 1924.

"This was before the Depression, and he paid for the farm by cutting timber. That was the primary source of his income," says Jones.

Green Fuel Feeds Virginia's Rural Economy

Jan 13, 2016
Virginia Tech

Every year, Virginia spends a billion dollars on energy from somewhere else – fuel oil, propane or kerosene to heat homes.  Now, farmers in Virginia are growing an alternative fuel – a clean, sustainable grass that promises to keep the cash here in the Commonwealth.  Sandy Hausman has that story.

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/

With so many cars on the road this holiday season, it’s easy to see why automobiles account for almost half of the country’s fuel consumption.  But what if cars could recover some of that energy for other uses? An engineering professor at Virginia Tech is working on a way to give cars exactly that kind of ‘energy bump.’

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering Lei Zuo and his team are working on a new kind of shock absorber that would not only enhance a car’s ride, but also create energy just from driving on the road.

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