Medicare and Medicaid

One of the biggest issues for this legislative session is whether to expand Medicaid.  The Affordable Care Act assumed states would do that and offered to pay the full cost for the first three years – then scaling back to 90% over the next seven years.  

About half the states – including Virginia – refused, and that means about 190,000 people in the Commonwealth will still be without medical coverage.  Governor McAuliffe is pushing for expansion of Medicaid, but Republicans are pushing back with some surprising proposals.

Hospitals here in Virginia are sounding the alarm – warning state lawmakers that they’ll be in big financial trouble if the legislature does not expand Medicaid.

The Affordable Care Act set out to provide health care coverage for almost everyone.  Only undocumented residents were left out.  The bill promised affordable health insurance, and for those who made too little money, states were supposed to expand their Medicaid programs, and the federal government would pick up the tab. 

The General Assembly panel that will decide whether and how to expand Medicaid in Virginia took a look today at the experiences of other states. 

The Medicaid Innovation and Reform Commission was especially interested in cost-controlling factors, aspects that worked, and mistakes to be avoided.   The authors of research studies that crunched the numbers also attended.

Roanoke Times Digs into the Affordable Care Act

Jul 12, 2013

The Roanoke Times presents another installment of its series examining how the Affordable Care Act will change how you access and pay for health care.
Reporter Lawrence Hammack and his colleague David Ress have been investigating the impact of the new law on individuals, businesses, and health care providers in Virginia.


 

Division Over Medicaid Overhaul

Jun 18, 2013

The General Assembly panel tasked with deciding whether Virginia should expand its Medicaid program or not held its first meeting–in a room packed with expansion opponents, many representing groups such as Americans for Prosperity.

The Senators and Delegates wasted no time getting up to speed on the complex facts about how the program currently operates.

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