Marriage and Relationships

Steve Helber/AP via NPR

A coalition of faith-based groups says its members have been betrayed by Attorney General Mark Herring, who they say has gone against the will of the people by fighting to overturn Virginia's gay marriage ban approved by voters just eight years ago.

The groups want Herring to be impeached, step down, or assign a special attorney to represent the state in the related court case.

Loving vs. Virginia

Jan 23, 2014

The issue of gay marriage resonates in Virginia in particular, because of a landmark 1967 Supreme Court decision involving a Virginia couple and interracial marriage.

You can hear the archived story of Mildred and Richard Loving whose home was raided by police in 1958.  They were charged with violating the state’s Racial Integrity Law. 
 

 Audio FileFrom our archives, you can hear Sandy Hausman's report on Loving vs. Virginia.Edit | Remove

Constituents React

Jan 23, 2014

Since Attorney General Mark Herring announced his decision to side with plaintiffs in the lawsuits challenging the state’s ban on gay marriage—reaction is coming in from constituents, and partisan and advocacy groups.

Reporter Sandy Hausman took to the streets of  Crozet  and Charlottesville, and here’s a montage  of the reaction she heard  from folks .

Back in 2006, 57 percent of Virginians approved the same-sex marriage ban.  This summer, a Quinnipiac University poll found the numbers had dropped—down to 43-percent of Virginians opposing gay marriage.

 

He hasn't been on the job for two full weeks, and Virginia's Attorney General Mark Herring is already shaking things up.

While he doesn’t surprise anyone by sticking to his campaign pledge of fighting for marriage equality, he does strike a chord on all sides by saying that Virginia's legal position has shifted.

Herring says he will use his office's resources to join a lawsuit challenging the state Constitution’s provision that upholds traditional marriage.

A coalition of Richmond-area pastors says Richmond's City Council is overstepping its authority by considering an ordinance that would grant benefits to spouses of city workers in same-sex marriages. 

The pastors say the state Constitution is clear in its definition of a marriage being between one man and one woman—which is also as the New Testament defines it.

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