Local Government

Virginia Public Access Project
9:39 am
Mon April 22, 2013

VaNews for 04.22.13

Times have changed at one of Virginia’s oldest political events and the academic background of a Richmond school board member is under scrutiny.

Those were two of the most frequently read newspaper stories over the past week the Virginia Public Access Project’s VaNews link.

VaNews is a free public service of the Virginia Public Access Project and can be found at vpap.org.

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Education
12:56 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Teachers Weigh in on the General Assembly Session

The dust has settled in Richmond.  Lawmakers and lobbyists have gone home, and educators are licking their wounds after failing to get much more money for public schools. 

Barbara Coyle is neatly dressed and coifed – polite and professional -- but a measure of frustration simmers under the surface when she talks about the plight of Virginia schools.

“The state dollars have been declining, the federal dollars have been declining and it’s been put back to the localities to make up that difference.”

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Government & Politics
5:32 pm
Tue April 2, 2013

Restructuring Virginia's Tax System

In the last 20 years, Virginia’s manufacturing sector has declined by 46%. 

Given the fierce competition worldwide to attract businesses, state lawmakers are examining whether it makes sense to restructure the Commonwealth’s state and local tax system to remove financial hurdles to doing business here.  

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Delaying Background Checks
4:38 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

Second Chance Advocates want to Ban the Box

Forty-three localities nationwide, including Newport News, have "banned the box."

That means they have eliminated job applications that ask if a person has been convicted of a felony. 

Some who sit on Richmond City Council want to join those localities. They’re hoping that the measure could eventually be introduced as statewide legislation across the street at the State Capitol.

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Development Rarely Pays
1:32 pm
Wed March 20, 2013

The Downside of Development

Every five years, Virginia requires cities and counties to update plans for development – how and where they’ll grow. 

Many communities assume growth is good – and some even offer tax breaks to attract new industries and businesses, but a new report by Charlottesville economist David Shreve and planning consultant Craig Evans suggests that’s not the case if new companies hire people from elsewhere. 

That’s because new residents increase the demand for public services, such as education, road construction and maintenance, public safety, water systems, sewers and so on.

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