Law and Crime

Creative Commons

A number of new driving and traffic safety laws take effect in Virginia on Wednesday that could provide some relief to plenty of motorists.  But if drivers aren't careful, they also could be relieved of some hard-earned cash for new infractions.

If you're an impatient driver on a single-lane road with slower moving obstacles in front of you, there's good news.

“You may cross a double yellow line to pass a pedestrian or a device which is moved by human power. Which is including bicycles, skateboards, and foot scooters.”

TV Moonshiner Goes Legit

Jun 23, 2015

The Discovery Channel’s show Moonshiners made one Virginia man famous, but distiller Tim Smith says it didn’t make him rich, so he’s found another way to achieve that goal.

Viewers who’ve seen Moonshiners definitely have the impression of reality TV, as Tim Smith - who lives in Climax, Virginia - fires up an illegal still with the help of his son JT and his business partner Tickle. “Hidden deep within the hollows of a forgotten hollow of America, a battle is raging.” 

VaNews for 6.22.15: High School Diplomas On-Line

Jun 22, 2015

Arlington County has made it a little more costly for people who violate the anti-profanity law...and Virginia will begin offering students a chance to get their public high school diplomas without ever seeing the inside of a classroom. Those have been among the most read stories over the past week at the Virginia Public Access Project's VaNews link on vpap.org.

High School graduation rates appear to be on the rise across the country, but for one segment of the population, they’ve dropped dramatically. The pass rate for prison inmates taking the G-E-D plummeted after a new computer based test was introduced in 2014.

G-E-D stands for General Education Diploma. It’s a test people can take if they failed to get their high school degrees. Corrections facilities are facing new challenges in making the tests available to inmates, even as experts stress, there’s nothing better than that degree to keep people from returning to jail.

Reactions vary to a Democratic lawsuit challenging Virginia’s voter photo ID law—based primarily on which side of the political spectrum the stakeholders fall.  

Democrats argue that this is another attempt to disenfranchise minority and other voters, while the GOP and the law’s chief sponsor say it's designed to protect the integrity of the voting system. But political observers are wondering how this lawsuit will progress—and what's the best course of action for the state’s Democratic Attorney General.

Pages