Law and Crime

Associated Press

Yesterday, in a story exclusive to WVTF and the Washington Post, reporter Sandy Hausman revealed new evidence in the case of a former UVA honors student, convicted in 1990 in the bloody murder of his girlfriend’s parents.  DNA analysis now appears to confirm what Jens Soering has been saying all along - that another man committed the crime.  Today, we look at additional evidence supporting Soering’s request for a pardon from the governor.

The Promise Movie

It’s been more than 30 years since police arrested Jens Soering, an honors student from the University of Virginia, and charged him with the brutal murder of his girlfriend’s parents in their Bedford County home.  To this day, Soering insists he is innocent, but he’s been turned down for parole nearly a dozen times.  Today, his lawyer filed a petition asking for a full pardon - citing new evidence that Soering is not guilty.  

Families Baffled by Prison Release Dates

Aug 12, 2016
Creative Commons

Virginia does not offer parole to people in its prisons, but it does have something called “good time,” -- a certain number of days subtracted from a sentence for each 30 days of good behavior behind bars.  That may sound simple, but every day people call to complain that their calculations don’t match those of the Virginia Department of Corrections.  Sandy Hausman reports:

Tom Woodward/Creative Commons

Several members of the Virginia congressional delegation are calling the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau to take swift action against mandatory arbitration clauses. Those are provisions tucked away into consumer financial contracts that allow corporations to avoid lawsuits. 

Associated Press

As schools across Virginia prepare for the end of summer and the first day of classes, superintendents and principals will be waiting to hear the outcome in a dramatic court case that could have a lasting influence for transgender students across the country.

A Gloucester County transgender student will not be able to use the bathroom that corresponds to his gender identity when classes start this fall. That’s because four justices on the Supreme Court are blocking an injunction issued by the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals in his case against the school system there. 

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