K-12

whitehouse.gov

What if high-schoolers in Virginia could take a computer programming class instead of French or Spanish? Lawmakers in Richmond are considering allowing that swap, as one way to get more kids into computer science.

With talk of gigahertz and infinite loops, Intro to Computer Programming at Henrico County’s Deep Run High School, certainly sounds like a foreign language class. And if some Virginia lawmakers get their way, it could also count as a foreign language.

The Associated Press

A legal battle that began in a Gloucester, Virginia high school will be heard Wednesday in Richmond by a federal appeals court.

In question: whether a local school board can prohibit a transgender student from using the restroom of their choice.

The answer could guide school systems nationwide.

16-year-old Gavin Grimm has attended local school board meetings, and no wonder, those meetings have been about him.

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Virginia’s Governor has proposed a series of changes to public education aimed at preparing students to join the workforce, but the state’s teachers may not like some of his ideas.  

Terry McAuliffe wants to set new requirements for high school grads, emphasize hands-on instruction, and offer industry credentials.  He thinks schools should be allowed to hire industry experts to teach on a temporary or part-time basis, but at the Virginia Education Association, which represents teachers, President Meg Gruber has doubts when it comes to science and math.

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Part of Governor McAuliffe’s overall proposed budget includes more than $1 billion dollars allotted for education.

Among the initiatives poised to receive that funding, John O’Neil with the Virginia Education Association says several stand out, such as adding thousands of much-needed teaching positions, and a $50 million dollar increase in funding for programs helping at-risk students

Overhauling 'No Child Left Behind'

Dec 7, 2015

Virginia educators and state leaders are soon expected to be able to exert more control over local schools across the commonwealth.

Lawmakers were supposed to overhaul No Child Left Behind in 2007 but they couldn't bridge the ideological divide. That's left a patchwork across the nation as the Obama Administration compelled states to embrace it's Common Core standards while granting waivers to some 43 states. Virginia Democratic Congressman Bobby Scott was a key player in scrapping No Child Left Behind. He says the new bill gives states the leeway they've been craving. 

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