K-12

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According to a new poll from the Virginia Education Association, almost three quarters of Virginians say teachers in the state don’t make enough money. It looks like teachers will be getting a raise in this year’s budget...but the question is how much.

Virginia’s teachers make almost $7,000 below the the national average. And that’s making it hard for the state to attract, and keep, teachers in the classroom -- says Meg Gruber with the Education Association.

  If you don’t have kids you still have to pay the taxes that support public schools, just like everyone else. But Republicans in the state legislature are putting weight behind an educational measure that would change that. A proposed bill would allow parents who send their kids to private school or home-school to get some of their tax money back.

That money wouldn’t go straight into parents’ pockets, but into a savings account that could only be accessed for educational spending.

Lawmakers in Richmond this legislative session are hoping to minimize the risk of gun violence in Virginia's public schools.

One measure that made its way easily through committee this morning would actually allow school security officers who have worked in law enforcement before to carry a gun when working.

Delegate Scott Lingamfelter, a Republican from Northern Virginia, says individual school boards would have to sign off on the idea -- but he hopes they will.

"And I think those that do, could one day forestall a terrible tragedy,” said Lingamfelter.

whitehouse.gov

What if high-schoolers in Virginia could take a computer programming class instead of French or Spanish? Lawmakers in Richmond are considering allowing that swap, as one way to get more kids into computer science.

With talk of gigahertz and infinite loops, Intro to Computer Programming at Henrico County’s Deep Run High School, certainly sounds like a foreign language class. And if some Virginia lawmakers get their way, it could also count as a foreign language.

The Associated Press

A legal battle that began in a Gloucester, Virginia high school will be heard Wednesday in Richmond by a federal appeals court.

In question: whether a local school board can prohibit a transgender student from using the restroom of their choice.

The answer could guide school systems nationwide.

16-year-old Gavin Grimm has attended local school board meetings, and no wonder, those meetings have been about him.

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