Human Brain

Study Links The Brain To Aggressive Behavior

Nov 30, 2017
Virginia Commonwealth University

Social scientists say children who are physically abused are more likely to be abusive themselves as adults, but research at Virginia Commonwealth University suggests another factor in people who are violent.  Their brains are downright different.  

Alison Fine

The year 1984 has come and gone, but what if George Orwell’s “Thought Police,” featured in that classic novel, are about to arrive?  A new study suggests that for the first time, it’s possible to determine what people are thinking, using MRI brain imaging technology. Robbie Harris has more . 

The disappearance of Hannah Graham reminds parents of the need to warn their kids about dangers in the world, but it’s not an easy job  -- especially as children grow into young adults.  Experts in the field of psychology say it might be a good idea to teach kids the “P” word. 

When members of the so-called Islamic state began beheading American and British journalists and aid workers, recording and posting the executions online, one mother pleaded publicly with them to spare her son.  That plea failed, perhaps because the killers are psychopaths or sociopaths.

Studying the Teen Brain

Jul 17, 2014
Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute

Even though every adult today was once a teenager, the teen brain remains a mystery to almost everyone.  Especially when it comes to risk taking.   What makes some teens daredevils and others, not-so-much?

That’s what psychologists at The Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute will be looking into in a new study that will last three years. 

Remember a young Tom Cruise in the movie Risky Business where he’s racing his father’s Porsche around Chicago even though he was warned not too?  He’s lovin’ it, because it’s forbidden.

Some Thinking on Brain "Mapping"

May 16, 2013

Recently President Barack Obama announced a decade-long, $100-million  project to map the human brain.

At Washington & Lee University, Professor Tyler Lorig, chair of the Neuroscience program, offered mixed reactions.

Lorig says while he welcomes the attention to the new announcement—he knows the money won’t go nearly as far as the public might expect. He's  also concerned about misconceptions which stem from the language describing the project as “mapping”.

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