History

The Normandy Invasion Anniversary
8:06 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Bernard Marie: Child Witness to the D-Day Invasion

A chat with a Roanoke resident, who as a child, witnessed the Invasion of Normandy in France in 1944. Tab O'Neal has a conversation with Bernard Marie.  

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Government & Politics
7:32 am
Mon May 19, 2014

VaNews for 5.19.14

An apparent Paleo-Indian ritual site found in Virginia may pre-date Stonehenge by 50 centuries...and a perplexing question about Williamsburg's unemployment rate has been answered by a pair of college students.

These have been among the most read stories this past week at the Virginia Public Access Project's  VaNews link on vpap.org.

    

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Location Negotiations
4:33 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Slavery Museum Closer to Becoming a Reality

First African Baptist Church, Richmond, VA

Former Governor Doug Wilder says he's received lots of inquiries regarding the future of a proposed National Slavery Museum, so he's revealed what he hopes to be its new location. 

While Fredericksburg is no longer a consideration, Wilder says a historic church now owned by Virginia Commonwealth University would be ideal.

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Shockoe Bottom
9:40 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Richmond Wrangling Over Future of Historic Slave Trade Site

Ana Edwards, the chief opponent of the Shockoe Bottom stadium proposal, talks about historical markers at the Lumkin Jail historical site in Richmond.
Credit Steve Helber/AP via NPR

On a warm spring night, more than 150 people gathered in Shockoe Bottom, a name taken from the Native American word for a site in Richmond.

This part of town, bounded by I-95 and bisected by railroad lines, was central to a city that prospered from the slave trade.

"The best guesstimate is several hundred thousand people were sold out of Shockoe Bottom," says Phil Wilayto, a leader of the grassroots movement to establish a memorial park here. "Probably the majority of African-Americans today could trace some ancestry to this small piece of land."

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Virginia Museum of Fine Art
10:04 am
Mon May 5, 2014

Monuments Men: The Richmond Collection

South Seas Landscape, Emil Nolde, 1914
Credit Gift of Dr. George and Mrs. Marylou Fischer, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts

The film Monuments Men raised public awareness about what happened to important works of art in Nazi Germany. 

Some of it was destroyed, while other pieces were hidden away.  One especially valuable collection made its way to Richmond, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts says it just got one of the missing paintings back.

Between 1910 and 1930, one family in Germany - the Fischers --  collected the works of modern painters.  Robin Nicholson, Deputy Director of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts says the Nazis disliked and often destroyed such work.

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