History

New Sites Added to VA Landmarks Register

Mar 18, 2016

 Virginia’s Department of Historic Resources has added five new sites to the Virginia Landmarks Register. 

 

 The western shores of the Chesapeake Bay have a deep history of slavery. One black community is memorializing its past and engaging its white community in moving forward. 

 

It's been a ten year journey for former classmates of the Holley Graded School to convert the four-room schoolhouse in Lottsburg into a museum. Two abolitionists, Sally Holley and Caroline Putnam, built the school for former slaves soon after the Civil War ended. Their efforts are documented in letters to one of their biggest financial supporters, writer Louisa May Alcott.

 

A plan to relocate two slave cabins at the former site of a plantation in Botetourt County has prompted members of the historical society there - and some residents - to take action.

Greenfield Plantation was established in the mid-18th century by Colonel William Preston, a revolutionary war veteran, member of the House of Burgesses, and surveyor westward lands. Though the plantation itself burned down in 1959, two slave quarters remain. Ann Layman, Vice President of the Botetourt County Historical Society, says their proximity to the home is historically significant.

http://www.bedfordareachamber.com/pages/HistoryTourism

Nearly every Virginia County has a genealogy, historic, or heritage society. They vary from single rooms with books and records to vast digitized. In Bedford, between Lynchburg and Roanoke, the genealogical library shares space with the museum. Jennifer Thompson is the librarian there. She spoke with Tab O'Neal about finding our roots beneath the sod of history.

Bedford Museum and Genealogical Library

List of Genealogy and History Societies in Virginia

In recent months, Richmonders have been deciding how best to memorialize the city's difficult history with race and slavery. Between state and city funds there are almost 20 million dollars to spend on a slavery museum and improvements to the city's Slave Trail.

Lumpkin's Jail, or "the devil's half acre" was the city's most notorious slave jail from the 1830's to the Civil War -- when Richmond was one of the largest hubs of slave trading in America.

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