Government & Politics

An in-depth look at the issues and policies of our government from the local, state and national levels.

Associated Press

It's over. Court of Appeals Judge Stephen McCullough has been elected to the Virginia Supreme Court-with lots of dissent from mostly Democrats, including Governor McAuliffe. 

    

  

Roanoke Celebrates International Women's Day 2016

Mar 3, 2016

International Women’s Day is March 8. It’s a global celebration of women’s rights in the labor movement and the right to vote.

In Roanoke, the Wiese Law Firm is coordinating a celebration of Virginia women, with an event Friday, 3/4/16  at the Taubman Museum from 5 to 9 p.m.

Speakers include:

Judge Jacqueline Talevi, Chief Judge of the General District Courts for the 23rd Judicial District.

Janet Osborne, MD Chief, Gynecology/Oncology at Carilion Clinic (preventative/women's reproductive health)

Virginia voters get to weigh in on the presidential contest this week. While some of the state’s congressional delegation have made public endorsements, others are sitting on the sidelines.      

Virginia always matters in general elections, but primaries are a different story. The presidential contests are usually becoming a little more clear by the time commonwealth voters get to weigh in, but this year’s races have thrown all conventional political wisdom out the window, according to Virginia Democratic Senator Mark Warner.

Virginia’s primary election, coming up on Tuesday, is many things, but one thing it is not, is a snooze.  Many young voters say they’re excited about the race. They hear candidates staking out clear positions on issues that affect them. Robbie Harris talked with some who will be voting in their first presidential primary.

OK, this is a group of very tuned in college students. And our conversation is far from a scientifically balanced survey.

Super Tuesday: How to Vote

Feb 29, 2016

Tuesday is an election day -- Virginians’ turn to get their say in who should be the Republican or Democratic nominee for President.

Grab a photo ID -- a license, passport, or employee badge will all work -- and head to your polling place sometime between 6 a.m. and 7 p.m.

“As long as you’re in line at 7 p.m. you are going to be able to vote, so please do!”  

Liz Howard is the Deputy Commissioner at the Department of Elections. She says the first question voters will get is whether they’d like a Republican ballot, or Democratic one.

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