Fracking

"Pipeline Fighters" Documentary Premiers in Blacksburg

Feb 14, 2017

A documentary called ‘Pipeline Fighters” will debut in Theaters in Blacksburg and Roanoke.  It began as an online series about the Mountain Valley Pipeline.  Now it’s become a feature length film that also examines the impact pipelines and fracked natural gas are having on communities beyond the state.  

AP Photo/Ralph Wilson

Opponents to natural gas pipelines in Virginia are calling on the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to do a comprehensive review of all four of the proposed projects. 

Thirty organizations in Virginia are calling on FERC to take a bird’s eye view of the natural gas infrastructure to determine if 4 new pipelines, currently in the planning stages, are really necessary. The pipelines would bring fracked natural gas from West Virginia through Virginia into North Carolina. Opponents say they are a threat to the region’s water, scenic beauty and public safety.

Changing the Path of the Pipeline

Oct 12, 2015

There’s been strong public opposition to plans for a pipeline to carry natural gas 560 miles -- from the fracking fields of West Virginia to customers in Virginia and North Carolina.  Now, Dominion Virginia Power says it will change the path of the Atlantic Coast Pipeline -- a change that could affect property owners in Augusta County.

Deciding where the pipeline would travel in Virginia has been a contentious process, with many people in its path objecting.  Some fear construction or a leak could contaminate public water supplies, and Dominion has agreed to make a change.

Hands Across Our Land Focuses on Property Rights

Aug 17, 2015

Grassroots groups in eight states will conduct coordinated demonstrations against fossil fuel development they say is a threat to rural America.  Actions are planned tomorrow, (Tuesday, 8/19)  in Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, West Virginia and more. 

File Photo

For years the use of hydraulic fracturing—or fracking—has been exclusive to Southwest Virginia, but some organizations and communities are vehemently opposed to it. Now, as companies are exploring more energy sources throughout the state, such as natural gas and shale, officials are feeling more pressure to amend regulations that govern the practice. 

State Water Commission Chair and Delegate Thomas Wright says he's in favor of offshore drilling and whatever the state can do to produce more energy—but he also advocates environmental stewardship.

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